Pond plant list - looking for opinions

LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,529
I have a new, small pond, approx 1.5m x 2.5m and about 45cm deep at the deepest point and with various different levels, including a 'beach'. I already have some blue/purple pond irises and a water lily that is possibly too large a variety for the pond (both passed on to me so I'm not sure of their names. If the lily turns out to be too big I will remove it and get a little one).

After doing some research I've put together a list of plants I'd like, but before I place an order I'd really like some opinions from people with pond experience. Are any of these, in your experience, to invasive for a small pond? Or horrors in any other way? I am looking for a decent amount of height, so that would be a plus. And evergreen / OK winter structure would be especially good, though I know there's not many that can offer that. I won't be buying all of these, obviously!

Here's my list, with stars by the ones I particularly like:
  • Hornwort (Ceratophyllum demersum)
  • Starwort (Callitriche)
  • Frogbit (Hydrocharis morsus-ranae)*
  • Water hawthorn (Aponogeton)*
  • Golden club (Orontium aquaticum)
  • Blue pickerel (Pontederia cordata)
  • Water forget-me-not (Myosotis scorpioides)
  • Bistort (Persicaria amphibia)*
  • Arrowhead (Sagittaria)*
  • Flowering rush (Botomus umbellatus)*
  • Marsh woundwort (Stachys palustris)
  • Marsh cinquefoil (Potentilla palustris)*
  • Barred horsetail (Equisetum)*
'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
- Cicero
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Posts

  • RubyLeafRubyLeaf Posts: 207
    edited March 2018
    Equisetum is a favourite of mine. Slow to spread and not a quick grower. Produces no seed either so its perfect. No experience with the others I'm afraid.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,333
    Pontederia is gorgeous and adds height and form.  Being a Sag I'd always have sagittaria sagittifolia.  Water hawthorn is well behaved and pretty in my experience.  Persicaria can spread rapidly if happy which is fine in a large pond with marginal banks but maybe not so good in a small one if it escapes its planting basket.   Barred equisetum is lovely as long as it's contained.

    Have never grown the others so can't help.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 554
    Agree Pontederia is lovely, and good for height.  I can also recommend Phalaria arundinacea for a bit more height.  It has variegated leaves, and very pale pink flowers, and adds some movement. We have a dwarf water lilly, Nymphaea pygmaea rubra, and there is also a white version, great for small ponds (ours is 1x x 1.5m).    
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,529
    Thank you @RubyLeaf, @Obelixx and @KeenOnGreen, really useful answers. I had a feeling that would be the case for the Persicaria, Obxx, so I think I'll give that one a miss. It's a shame though - I like the leaf shape a lot. Thanks for the recommendations too, KonG.

    I did wonder if the Water forget-me-not was so called purely because of its appearance or whether it had a similarly 'pop up everywhere' nature. Has anyone got Botomus? I do like an umbel shape so I really hope it's suitable for my pond. And does anyone have a view on any oxygenators, or is it just a matter of picking a few and chucking them in, doesn't really matter which?
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,333
    It does matter which oxygenator you choose LG as some have become invasive.  I suggest you check the RHS site for the latest info on what to avoid.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,529
    I meant of the above ones, really - in that I've done the basic research (incl RHS site) but wanted to finalise my choices with a bit of personal experience added to the mix :)
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,333
    Sorry.  The last time I actively put oxygenators in a pond was in the mid 80s and all sorts of things have been found to be unsuitable since then.   The pond in teh Belgian garden was for drainage so dry or just a bog in summer so I surrounded it with marginals planted directly in the soil - persicaria very happy but pontederia and sagittaria succumbed to Siberian frosts below -20C - as did most of the banded equisetum.   

    I had all those plus water hawthorn in my Harrow pond and loved it and Canadian pond weed as an oxygenator but that is now discouraged as invasive.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Chris789Chris789 Posts: 52
    I have frog bit, hornwort, flowering rush and I have White forget me nots. I’d definitely recommend the frog bit it’s really nice, grows well and is easy to control, you just fish out and chuck away what you don’t need. I have to remove a bit of hornwort every now and again but it’s again no trouble. I love the white forget me not, it’s probably not as great as the blue not being native but IMO looks so much better and isn’t overly invasive but does increase. Lastly the flowering rush, I struggle a bit with it, it flowered the first year really nicely but not at all last 2 years , it still look healthy folage wise but it is disappointing if it’s not going to flower. I have a grass that works quite well Carex Bowles Golden might my worth looking at?
  • Chris789Chris789 Posts: 52
    That’s the grass, with the forget me not and frog bit (and annoyingly the duck weed that I hate so much!!)
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,529
    Thanks Obxx. I've been cross-referencing the Wildlife Trusts guidance with the RHS stuff so am hoping not to have anything properly problematic on my list. But of course there are plants that are not officially problematic but empirical evidence suggests otherwise! I'm pleased about the water hawthorn - it looks lovely.

    Yes, Chris, it was the white forget-me-not I was keen on too - good to see a photo. I hadn't thought to put a grass in the water really, but I like that lime green - thanks for the suggestion. Definitely going for frogbit :). Shame about the Botomus; I think I'll still try it though.
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
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