Forum home Problem solving

Garden wall

good evening, I have read many problems with dividing fences which don't seem to solve my problem so please can anyone help with this one.

We have lived in our bungalow for 2 years, our next door neighbours persuaded the previous owner to let them take down her 1.8mtr fence and build a brick wall on their own  property.
the problem is we live on quite a slope which means that the wall was built lower down the slope leaving our property exposed with very little privacy. To compound the situation our neighbours have installed cctv cameras that completely overlook our property back and front.  Our neighbours are in the process of moving so my question is are we within our rights to put back a 1.8 meter fence on our boundary line which will appear much higher on their side so we can have some privacy. 
«13

Posts

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 9,229
    Yes, you can do what you like within your boundary, as long as the fence does not exceed 2 mtrs in height, although you may possibly have problems in digging out for the fence posts and must not damage the foundations of their wall. Also, I think the CCTV cameras must not infringe your privacy and must point away from your property.
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,590
    I am no expert on property law, but I would imagine the first place to start would be your deeds, to establish if possible where the actual boundary is, if there is any doubt or possibility of future objections. Photographs or evidence of the previous owner’s fence would also help. I think I am right in saying if the posts were on your side it was definitely your ex-fence. You certainly have the right to build a fence on your land and I have seen back to back fences, each owned by the respective parties. If your current neighbours are moving, so presumably no longer bothered, why not get in quick and erect your fence, before a new owner has a chance to object? On the other hand, perhaps a prospective new owner would also value increased privacy. Indeed they might want to raise their own wall so you don’t have to! You have a right to the peaceful enjoyment of your property and I personally would be more concerned by their intrusive cctv, which you could reasonably ask them to redirect so it does not record your garden activities. Might be worth looking at the law on that point or speaking to your local council.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,414
    Lizzie27 said:
     Also, I think the CCTV cameras must not infringe your privacy and must point away from your property.
    I read a Which report recently which stated much the same.
  • Thank you for all the comments. The CTCV cameras are round so take in all angles by the look of them. They can take in 2 of our bedrooms, all of our drive and most of our front and back garden. 
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 13,927
    It sounds entirely reasonable to ask your neighbours to move it / restrict it. From what I read, there is nothing illegal about having a neighbour's camera pointing at your house if it's for security. It seems to be an increasing problem nationally.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,414
    edited March 2018
    It sounds entirely reasonable to ask your neighbours to move it / restrict it. From what I read, there is nothing illegal about having a neighbour's camera pointing at your house if it's for security. It seems to be an increasing problem nationally.
    I found this on the Which site, referring to positioning of security cameras.

    "If you’re thinking of getting a home CCTV system for the outside of your property, you must comply with privacy laws. This means making sure that your cameras aren’t pointed at public spaces, or other people’s houses or gardens."

    Read more: https://www.which.co.uk/reviews/burglar-alarms-and-home-security/article/burglar-alarms-and-home-security/home-cctv - Which?

    I have to admit that what is stated by Which regarding public spaces seems odd to me.  There was an incident near my in-laws and the police asked if they had a cctv camera covering the area.  The area of interest was the street outside the house and a park opposite.


  • FireFire LondonPosts: 13,927
    @KT53, yes, it's a shame that Which don't link to which "privacy laws" they are thinking of. Like much new-ish, publicly cheap and widely available tech, the laws have not caught up and I suspect they fall into a grey legal area, which may be a bit hard to enforce.

    Hobby camera drones are an issue around my area, as I live next to a big park. People love to fly them there (you can capture amazing footage and practice) and you can pick one up at Argos for £30. But they often come and hover over my garden, which I don't like. All very Jason Bourne. But if I were 18 I would be thrilled with them and have three.
  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Than you Freddies Dad,  I was told by my neighbours that they couldn't see what was going on in our property, however they were so pleased with their purchase that they showed me what they could see and mistakenly showed our property in full technicolour
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 13,927
    Why did they get the cameras? What do they fear?
Sign In or Register to comment.