Greenhouse design help

Hello everyone!

I'm planning to build a greenhouse to be used for growing microgreens, Veggies and overwintering.

I was wondering if i can get all your advice as the place i'm wanting to build is quite exposed and always seems to be windy, normally a max of about 40mph.

I was just wondering if you think building a greenhouse is the best idea as i don't think a poly tunnel will last, here is my very basic plan below.

image

I intend to dig a small foundation and have a 1 high row of concrete blocks with a timber frame to screw the corrugated plastic to. Also to make it look a bit nicer i was thinking of cladding parts and then sealing them.

I'm toying with the idea of just having a sloped roof so the lowest point will be in line with the top of a hedge to make a natural windbreak.

(Corrugated plastic: https://www.diy.com/departments/translucent-pvc-roofing-sheet-2440mm-x-662mm-pack-of-10/1233780_BQ.prd )

What does everyone think?

thanks in advance,

Greg.

Last edited: 28 February 2018 13:27:34

Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,209

    THE ONLY WAY TO KNOW IS TO TRY IT OUT AND SEE IF IT WORKS.image

    GOOD LUCK.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • The north side doesn't need to be transparant. I would build a shed for all greenhouse things there. Doesn't need to be big, but it's nice to be able to hide things away. Can also be converted into a chicken coop if one wants to, and the chickens can use the greenhouse during winterdays when they don't want to go outside. 

  • GregRGregR Posts: 12
    Fire Lily says:

    The north side doesn't need to be transparant. I would build a shed for all greenhouse things there. Doesn't need to be big, but it's nice to be able to hide things away. Can also be converted into a chicken coop if one wants to, and the chickens can use the greenhouse during winterdays when they don't want to go outside. 

    See original post

     Thanks for the advice!

    I will clad the North wall, don't know why i didn't think of that ;) we already have a chicken coop at the top of the garden and a shed so just a wall will do.

  • GregRGregR Posts: 12
    pansyface says:

    THE ONLY WAY TO KNOW IS TO TRY IT OUT AND SEE IF IT WORKS.image

    GOOD LUCK.

    See original post

     could be quite a expensive experiment  ;)

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,403

    A lot depends on where you are and from which direction your prevailing winds come.   Sensible to clad most of the north side as little light will come from there except 3 or 4 weekends around the summer solstice at which time you won't need the extra light anyway.

    Make the lower side high enough to stand up in without banging your head.

    I would say you should build the framework with supports that allow for wires to allow you to hang bubble wrap in winter for extra insulation and also a gutter for rainwater capture.   Don't forget leccy for light and any heated propagators or heated bench you might install.  Lastly - ventilation so plants don't cook when it gets hot.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • GregRGregR Posts: 12
    Obelixx says:

    A lot depends on where you are and from which direction your prevailing winds come.   Sensible to clad most of the north side as little light will come from there except 3 or 4 weekends around the summer solstice at which time you won't need the extra light anyway.

    Make the lower side high enough to stand up in without banging your head.

    I would say you should build the framework with supports that allow for wires to allow you to hang bubble wrap in winter for extra insulation and also a gutter for rainwater capture.   Don't forget leccy for light and any heated propagators or heated bench you might install.  Lastly - ventilation so plants don't cook when it gets hot.

    See original post

     Thanks for that.

    Lots of helpful information, already been talking to a electrician as I did want a heater for the winter :) also want some sort of irrigation setup but might use solar for that.

    Definitely going to be having water harvesting setup! 

    My biggest worry is just how it will all hold up in the wind, the nextdoor neighbor had a glass greenhouse and that was taken by the wind despite having a hedge on the west which is where the wind mainly comes from.

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 8,281

    If the wooden frame is strong and securely fixed to solid foundations, I don't see why it wouldn't work.  Fixings and end sealings for corrugated sheets aren't very good though so those would be points of weakness.  Twinwall polycarb sheets would be much, much stronger and can add considerable structural strength but the cost is significantly higher, probably prohibitively so for this sort of size.

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • GregRGregR Posts: 12
    BobTheGardener says:

    If the wooden frame is strong and securely fixed to solid foundations, I don't see why it wouldn't work.  Fixings and end sealings for corrugated sheets aren't very good though so those would be points of weakness.  Twinwall polycarb sheets would be much, much stronger and can add considerable structural strength but the cost is significantly higher, probably prohibitively so for this sort of size.

    See original post

     Polycarbonate sheets are defiantly a option i will price up both, could even make the sides into smaller panels to reduce cost.

Sign In or Register to comment.