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Garden Kneeler Prototype (New Design)

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  • Hi, with this design, it is not actually the kneeling section that is in contact with the ground, it is the aluminium frame. This extends past the kneeling plate (see the picture below) providing plenty of stability and preventing the kneeler from toppling forwards. These two feet are also quite wide apart to stop the unit toppling the other way too. I can assure you that the unit is very stable with its three points of contact on the ground, even on slopes and uneven ground.

    image

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,564

    Clearly you've given this a lot of thought so well done you but for me personally I'd like to see the kneeling pad a bit larger - wider and deeper - and maybe have those side pieces hinged so they can be up or down according to preference.  Gardeners tend to work sideways too so being able to shift them would be good.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Fair enough, I better understand your point now. Thank you for the feedback and suggestion!

  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489

    Dylan, If a kneeler came onto the market, with a larger pad, I would buy one.

    SW Scotland
  • In your opinion, is the one on the prototype I have made big enough or do you think that it would need to be bigger still? Also, is the back support provided by the harness much of a feature for you (if it became easier to put on and the vertical pole also folded down) or not so much?

  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489

    Dylan, my kneeler pad is 40cm x 16 cm. From the photograph, yours looks wider.

    I would certainly like a width of 30cm. 

    The back support is less of a feature for me as I have no problem getting up using the handles, 38cm high from the pad, which allows for sideways movement when kneeling.

    SW Scotland
  • The kneeling pad I have designed is approximately 50cm by 30cm so there is plenty of room there!

    The harness etc is less to help the user get up from leaning over but more to help them lean over for a long time, not putting any strain on their back or back muscles

  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489

    Yes, I can see that the back support would be useful for someone with a back problem or even a general physical weakness.

    Your idea of the "four point racing harness" is good.

    SW Scotland
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,564

    50 x 30 seems good, especially compared to most but, for example, when planning places at a tale for dinners and banquets and such, 60cms are allowed per person to give shoulder space as well as chair space.  50cms between the two uprights at either side of the kneeler is a bit restrictive to movement so making them adjustable or removable would help.

    When we're kneeling to garden it's because we want to get down close to remove weed thoroughly without disturbing plants we want to keep but it also allows us to see any good seedlings and do dead heading close down.  As we go we see what's either side of us and tend to swing sideways rather than shuffle to have the object of our intentions directly in front.

    That's why we need the flexibility.  

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489

    Dylan, the Forum will be out of action for posting for a week starting on Wednesday.

    SW Scotland
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