Help with extremely muddy garden and driveway!

My mum has jist moved house and the front garden/driveway had been chewed up by vans and cars and is incredibly muddy and slippery. The driveway is a bit of a slope but nothing major.

I've seen those plastic grids you can get for gravel but not sure if it would be suitable on top of the mud or on a slight slope. Has anyone used them and know what surface they should be laid on?

The back garden is significantly worse and walking on the mud is like quicksand! It doesn't look too bad until you stand on it. 

Same again with the gravel grids, it that too unstable to put on the mud then turf or seed over the top?

It looks like it could do with compacting somehow but can't imagine a Wacker plate being much use on the mud, that's if it didn't disappear into the abyss first! I was thinking of laying sheets of wood we have lying around with some big heavy plant pots to try and level/compact it slightly?..

Is it a case of waiting to see if the summer will dry both the front and back gardens out or has anyone got any ideas?!

The back garden is more important because they have two dogs that can't go out there because of how bad it is.

Any help appreciated!!

Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 15,298

    THE PLASTIC MATS THAT YOU MENTION WOULD JUST SINK BENEATH THE WAVES, I THINK.

    ALL I CAN SUGGEST IS THAT YOU BUY A TONNE OF SHARP SAND, HAVE IT TIPPED ON THE FRONT GARDEN AND SPREAD IT EVENLY OVER THE SURFACE. OVER TIME IT WILL SINK IN. YOU CAN THEN REPLACE IT WITH ANOTHER TONNE. AND SO ON UNTIL YOU ARE EITHER DRY SHOD OR BORED TO DEATH.image

    Last edited: 24 February 2018 18:57:11

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • The only thing to do about the drive way is to build a new one, perhaps on top of the old. It has to do with safety, as fire trucks etc weigh more now than before, so they need to be able to take a lot of weight. You don't want your mom to burn do you? :)

    If your back garden is soggy, why not plant plants that grow in wetlands? Unless it's a drought, there is no need of watering. 

  • Sharp sand is a good idea but like you said keep adding until you get bored..or go bankrupt. It would need alot.

    Build a new one is the idea but with what and how? It is literally the whole back garden. Side to side, end to end.. that would be lots of plants.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,539

    Now that the photo uploading glitch has been fixed it would be helpful if we could see the problem ... any photos available?

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 3,688

    What is the driveway made of?  If it is concrete, paved or tarmac, might it be possible to hose it down or would it fun onto a public road?

    As to the back garden, I would just wait for dryer weather and see if the water disappears. Alternatively you could try a lorry load of cheap loose bark mulch if you can get hold of some as a temporary measure to soak up some of the moisture and provide a dryer surface for the dogs. 

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