Complete beginner! Simple garden advice

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Hi all

I have never owned a garden before and feel like there is so much that I don’t know that I don’t even know where to begin!

We haven’t really done anything outside since we moved in. But now the inside is sorted I really want to make some changes! 

We only have a small space and have a small toddler who loves being outdoors. So obviously would like to keep mostly free space. 

Keen to hear suggestions of what we could do with the raised area at the back. How To include some plants and which plants. Would love to be able to teach my little boy about planting and looking after flowers etc. And just want it to look a bit more exciting as expect we will be spending a lot of time outside in next couple of years! 

All advice really appreciated. 

Thanks 

Last edited: 18 February 2018 10:12:08

Posts

  • I would plant edibles, then I wouldn't have to worry if the toddler ate something. And the back looks like a perfect place for a veggie patch. :) Then some currants and a small fruit tree on the right side of the lawn. 

    A lot of edibles are also beautiful, like sunflowers, nasturtium.

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,593

    I would make a path - maybe with slabs like stepping stones, or possibly bark chips which are softer to fall over on - around that raised bit and plant the whole area up - get rid of the grass there. I'd plant a mixture of fruit bushes and plants with some easy vegetables, herbs and flowers - it depends which way it faces as to what exactly you could grow. Is it a sunny garden?

    Keep the lawn in the lower bit around your patio for now, so there's toddling room

    Flying...
    Or am I falling?
  • PosyPosy Posts: 1,639

    I would repair the fencing, level the ground and put down soft bark chippings and use the area for slides, swings trampolines etc. When your boy is a bit older and has enough control not to walk on the plants I would make a little bed for fast growing things that look pretty and/or can be eaten like nasturtiums and sunflowers. Strawberries are much more fun than prickly fruits and can be picked and eaten warm from the sun.

  • TheColdZebra says:
    image

    Hi all

    I have never owned a garden before and feel like there is so much that I don’t know that I don’t even know where to begin!

    We haven’t really done anything outside since we moved in. But now the inside is sorted I really want to make some changes! 

    We only have a small space and have a small toddler who loves being outdoors. So obviously would like to keep mostly free space. 

    Keen to hear suggestions of what we could do with the raised area at the back. How To include some plants and which plants. Would love to be able to teach my little boy about planting and looking after flowers etc. And just want it to look a bit more exciting as expect we will be spending a lot of time outside in next couple of years! 

    All advice really appreciated. 

    Thanks 

    Last edited: 18 February 2018 10:12:08

    See original post

     You have a wonderful space there! Ok yes the fencing needs urgent repairing. No need of leveling just be very careful with drainage because you have quite a lot of rain there (UK, I'm Spanish). I have a 2 and a half year old and she loves the garden. Although she looses attention quickly, logical of her age. I am going to tell you what plants she is curious about :)

    - Anything that smells quite strong and that includes herbs, she loves lavender. 

    - Flowers with strong colours. Avoid pastels if you him to be interested. 

    - She absolutely loves watching the bee hotel, get one! She can spend there much more time than with plants. And plant things that attract pollinators, she loves butterflies too. 

    - I have not achieved permission yet for a pond (? my husband refuses) but I bet my little girl would love it because of wildlife so I bet your prince would too.

    Oh! And buy him a spade and gloves and let him play around. I think it was Monty I once heard or read saying that plants can be replaced but those precious moments of kids enjoying a garden cannot (probably a better and much more graceful speech than mine but the message is there).

  • What direction is this garden facing? Depending on that you could possibly use the back area as your "grown up" garden and plant some lovely flowers and shrubs and veg patch etc and have little winding path to a nice seating area if it gets lots of sun. Your toddler could also be there and observe the bees etc. but it wouldn't meant for playing. The front bit can be the exclusively kids play area. and where he can run around, play football and have his toys etc.

    And I agree with others and would certainly do the fence first

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