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Plants for my pond to encourage wildlife

Hi there,

September just gone I built a pond. What plants do you suggest to encourage wildlife? Thanks

 imageimage

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Do you think putting a big log in the pond is a good idea? Any tips or tricks you think I may have missed? It's around 6inches deep around the sides and then drops down three shelves to the deep which is around 2 metres. :) 

Posts

  • It looks lovely!

    Six inches is still a bit deep for frogs or newts or hedgehogs to get out easily, so a few more stones piled in a couple of places  at the end away from the stream would help.

    You need lots  of oxygenating plants to mop up excess nutrients and help prevent blanket weed.

    A waterlily will help too by covering some of the water surface, as well as looking good and giving shelter to small beasties and lily pads for frogs to sit on. Choose one suitable for the size and depth of your pond - yours looks as if it could take something quite vigorous.

    Marginal plants sit at the edges and have slightly varying needs as to depth. Some will grow in 6 inches, others may need to perch on a brick. Some have leaves that float on the surface, and help in the same way as lilies but you also need some vertical ones, especially if you manage to attract dragon flies. The females sit on the stems to lay their eggs and the larvae crawl up them to begin their metamorphosis. Reedmace and Iris Acorus are very thuggish in their ways and can take over even quite a large area very quickly so best avoided, unless you want an annual battle. Other irises are more accomodatingimage

    Wild creatures also appreciate some cover while getting to and from the pond, so some suitable pondside planting would give them some protection.

    Waterside Nurseries and Puddleplants have both had good mentions on here, and are good sites to visit for more information.

    Last edited: 17 February 2018 13:51:27

  • RedwingRedwing Posts: 1,154

    I made a wildlife pond at the end of last summer too.  Here are links to two sites I've found with good native plant lists.  I'll be making my choices from these lists.  When we filled ours it was early September.  I didn't want to spend a lot of money on plants at that time of year so just got native oxygenators (milfoil and hornwort) which I put in then to keep the pond healthy over the winter and it seems to have worked so far as the water is nice and clear now but come March or early April I'll be planting more.

    https://sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/discover/in-your-garden/article/133  

    https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/advice/gardening-for-wildlife/water-for-wildlife/stocking-a-pond/

    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • Buttercupdays says:

    It looks lovely!

    Six inches is still a bit deep for frogs or newts or hedgehogs to get out easily, so a few more stones piled in a couple of places  at the end away from the stream would help.

    You need lots  of oxygenating plants to mop up excess nutrients and help prevent blanket weed.

    A waterlily will help too by covering some of the water surface, as well as looking good and giving shelter to small beasties and lily pads for frogs to sit on. Choose one suitable for the size and depth of your pond - yours looks as if it could take something quite vigorous.

    Marginal plants sit at the edges and have slightly varying needs as to depth. Some will grow in 6 inches, others may need to perch on a brick. Some have leaves that float on the surface, and help in the same way as lilies but you also need some vertical ones, especially if you manage to attract dragon flies. The females sit on the stems to lay their eggs and the larvae crawl up them to begin their metamorphosis. Reedmace and Iris Acorus are very thuggish in their ways and can take over even quite a large area very quickly so best avoided, unless you want an annual battle. Other irises are more accomodatingimage

    Wild creatures also appreciate some cover while getting to and from the pond, so some suitable pondside planting would give them some protection.

    Waterside Nurseries and Puddleplants have both had good mentions on here, and are good sites to visit for more information.

    Last edited: 17 February 2018 13:51:27

    See original post

    Thank you buttercupdays, I'm a complete novice at this.But I just went with my instinct on the design.I'm thrilled with the end result.I'll take a look at those sites you mention and I took your advice. This afternoon after you posted I created a beach the other end of the pond with some stones I had left over from the falls.It was a job on my to do list!

    I just can't wait for the warmer weather now.

    Happy pounding 

    G

  • Redwing says:

    I made a wildlife pond at the end of last summer too.  Here are links to two sites I've found with good native plant lists.  I'll be making my choices from these lists.  When we filled ours it was early September.  I didn't want to spend a lot of money on plants at that time of year so just got native oxygenators (milfoil and hornwort) which I put in then to keep the pond healthy over the winter and it seems to have worked so far as the water is nice and clear now but come March or early April I'll be planting more.

    https://sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/discover/in-your-garden/article/133  

    https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/advice/gardening-for-wildlife/water-for-wildlife/stocking-a-pond/

    See original post

    Thanks Redwing, I have a feeling my wallet will be lighter come March and April time !

    Do you have a pic of your pond? 

    Best

    G

  • RedwingRedwing Posts: 1,154

    Here is a picture.

    .image

    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • Redwing says:

    Here is a picture.

    .

    imageSee original post

    Nice !  

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