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Laying a new lawn

I have recently moved into a new build house on 27th December.  The site manager and the landscape gardener laid the lawn in September 2017.  When it rained heavily we noticed that the lawn was flooded, once the rain water had gone down, my husband looked closely at the lawn and you could roll the turf (in its original size) back like a roll of carpet, and there was hardly any soil underneath the turf but there does seem to be a lot of broken bricks etc.. My question is is this correct being as though it was laid 4 months ago.  The landscape gardener said that it is perfectly fine for it to do this. I need some advice please.

Posts

  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 4,987

    I am not a turf expert but I think they are trying it on. The grass roots should have penetrated down and the turf should be established by now. It seems to me they have skimped on the soil preparation & there is a hard pan that the grass roots can't grow into. Why would the roots go into a lot of old rubble when they can stay in the nice soil they came in? I think the turf needs lifting proper ground prep being done & then re-layed. Not now though in spring. The website below has articles on proper ground prep or go to GW archive or RHS website.

    https://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/

    AB Still learning

  • It's quite normal for the roots to establish slowly at the end of the season, so being able to lift the turf isn't the problem here. The base and lack of soil is. But buying a new build you were probably aware of this as it would have come up as part of your general research... pretty much all new builds by developers have very sparse topsoil and generally owners end up re-landscaping their gardens anyway when they realise they do not have a lawn that will ever look nice.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,402

    This extract from the NHBC guidelines I found on another forum may be of interest ...

    "... extract from the NHBC Standards: 
     
    Sitework that complies with the design and the guidance below will be acceptable for private roads, drives, paths and landscaping.
    constructions for private roads, shared private drives, private drives, car parking, paths and patios.

    GARDEN AREAS
    (up to 20m from the habitable parts of the home)
    9.2 - S5
    Garden areas shall be free from obstructions beneath the surface 
    Old foundations, concrete bases and similar obstructions occurring within 300mm of the finished ground surface should be removed.

    9.2 - S6
    Garden areas shall be adequately prepared for cultivation 
    Construction rubbish and debris should be removed from garden and other areas around the home.

    The ground around the home can be compacted by machinery and storage of materials during construction as well as when topsoil is being replaced and this can affect the structure of the soil and its draining capability. Where this occurs within 3m of the home appropriate action should be taken to suitably restore the drainage characteristics of the soil.

    Any ground disturbed during construction should be re-graded to conform to the general shape of the adjacent ground.

    Subsoil should not be placed over topsoil and any topsoil disturbed should be reinstated. Garden areas should be provided with topsoil to a thickness of not less than 100mm. The topsoil should not contain contaminants which are likely to present a hazard to users of the garden area...."

    http://forum.brand-newhomes.co.uk/snagging-and-defects/poorly-laid-turf/ 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Iain R says:

    I am not a turf expert but I think they are trying it on. The grass roots should have penetrated down and the turf should be established by now. It seems to me they have skimped on the soil preparation & there is a hard pan that the grass roots can't grow into. Why would the roots go into a lot of old rubble when they can stay in the nice soil they came in? I think the turf needs lifting proper ground prep being done & then re-layed. Not now though in spring. The website below has articles on proper ground prep or go to GW archive or RHS website.

    https://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/

    See original post

     

  • Thank you I will check out the link you sent to me.  

  • Dovefromabove says:

    This extract from the NHBC guidelines I found on another forum may be of interest ...

    "... extract from the NHBC Standards: 
     
    Sitework that complies with the design and the guidance below will be acceptable for private roads, drives, paths and landscaping.
    constructions for private roads, shared private drives, private drives, car parking, paths and patios.

    GARDEN AREAS
    (up to 20m from the habitable parts of the home)
    9.2 - S5
    Garden areas shall be free from obstructions beneath the surface 
    Old foundations, concrete bases and similar obstructions occurring within 300mm of the finished ground surface should be removed.

    9.2 - S6
    Garden areas shall be adequately prepared for cultivation 
    Construction rubbish and debris should be removed from garden and other areas around the home.

    The ground around the home can be compacted by machinery and storage of materials during construction as well as when topsoil is being replaced and this can affect the structure of the soil and its draining capability. Where this occurs within 3m of the home appropriate action should be taken to suitably restore the drainage characteristics of the soil.

    Any ground disturbed during construction should be re-graded to conform to the general shape of the adjacent ground.

    Subsoil should not be placed over topsoil and any topsoil disturbed should be reinstated. Garden areas should be provided with topsoil to a thickness of not less than 100mm. The topsoil should not contain contaminants which are likely to present a hazard to users of the garden area...."

    http://forum.brand-newhomes.co.uk/snagging-and-defects/poorly-laid-turf/ 

    See original post

     

  • Hi, Thank you for your reply, I am going to print out the link and hand it to both the 'Landscape Gardener' and the site manager and see what there response is.  

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