Permaculture

can anyone help me with the difference between   Permaculture& organic gardening? At our allotment im thinking of putting cardboard down on some areas then covering in compost

& & planting on top , I first read it in an article by charles dowsing, then saw it ( I think on a repeat of big dreams small spaces) mentioned by s couple who are leading permaculture experts, I love the idea of leaving what's in plCe( fruit trees raspberries& a few currants& adding to it so we only leave a couple of areas to grow veg, i hate bare soil! Can anyone advise me re this method ? Thanks in advance 

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 16,408

    Organic gardening means using natural fertilisers and pest controls and soil improvers as opposed to chemicals.   Permaculture, as I understand it, means no-dig and lots of mulching which is supposed to enhance soil structure and fertility over the seasons.  They are not mutually exclusive..  

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • rosemummyrosemummy Posts: 2,012

    Thanks obelixx,   will read further, think permaculture sounds a good plan for our allotment 

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,437

    Generally permaculture means planting a mixture of trees, shrubs and ground cover plants that are mutually beneficial to reduce the amount of fertiliser (from any source, including organic) that is needed. There are various plants that fix nitrogen and/or accumulate minerals and which then help other plants to access those nutrients, so these are grown in amongst, for example, plants that suppress weeds, deter pests, attract pollinators, reduce water evaporation, etc. The idea is that it is permanent - perennial - so not traditional veg growing which is almost entirely based around greedy annual plants.

    It is possible to garden organically growing exactly the same plants as a traditional allotment, as Obs says, using natural fertilisers and pest control to replace chemical ones. To go to a permaculture requires a fairly large shift in the type of plants - and therefore the sort of crops - that you grow.

    Last edited: 03 February 2018 08:41:21

    My heart has joined the thousand, for my friend stopped running today
  • rosemummyrosemummy Posts: 2,012

    Thanks raisin, I think I will have to do some research, but just having 2beds for annuals & many more perennials sounds like a great idea, not just as its we don't go up more than twice a week so traditional veg that needs lots of care is definitely out, I definitely want elder for flowers& berries, and species rise for hips, I like the idea of plenty of herbs, any good suggestions to grow near fruit tree ? There are loads of raspberries& a few black urea TVs, any more ideas from you knowledgable lot? thanks in advance

  • Permaculture isn't just about plants, no dig, organic etc, it's also about starting a self sufficient ecosystem. Like producing the manure and making use of waste water and rainwater rather than water from the ground. 

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,437

    Rosemummy, have a look here as a starting point https://www.agroforestry.co.uk/about-agroforestry/forest-gardening/ I think this may be the type of thing you are thinking of. It's not quite permaculture, but it is a perennial based system of food production that is far more sustainable than our more familiar approaches (I won't say traditional, because forest gardening and permaculture are far older as strategies for food production than our current more energy intensive methods).

    Fire lily - is your small holding a permaculture? Most UK allotments don't allow people to keep animals for manure, so proper permaculture isn't possible. Some don't even allow sheds or greenhouses so even rainwater collection can be a problem. You have to own your own land to give it a real go even on a micro-scale. So if you are using permaculture, your experience would be great to hear because we don't meet many people who've tried it image

    My heart has joined the thousand, for my friend stopped running today
  • raisingirl says:

    Fire lily - is your small holding a permaculture? Most UK allotments don't allow people to keep animals for manure, so proper permaculture isn't possible. Some don't even allow sheds or greenhouses so even rainwater collection can be a problem. You have to own your own land to give it a real go even on a micro-scale. So if you are using permaculture, your experience would be great to hear because we don't meet many people who've tried it image

    See original post

    Permaculture is where i'm heading, it takes a while though in a larger scale with very little money, so I guess i'm a beginner to. I will always need to grow annuals, there are just not enough hardy edible perennials for subartic climates, but I try and not to mess with the soil to much.

    If you can't keep animals, why not advertise for peoples bunnies poo or other animals like some birds etc? Or are you not allowed to use poo? And they can't say anything about you using your own pee can they?

  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 1,838

    Most of us will have access to Farm manures depending on where we live but most of it will be non-organic. There are some organic sources but as most organic farms want to use all that they produce the few that do sell it charge prohibitively high prices, (in the greater London area anyway). Some Allotment sites allow people to keep Hens and a few allow Rabbits but mainly in the north of England.

    AB Still learning

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,811

    When I worked a colleague bred and showed cavies ........ once a week she would bring me a bin bag full of guinea pig poo for my compost heap ... she would leave it under my car in the shade ... a new security guard who wasn't used to our routine raised the alarm as he thought someone with malign intent had left something 'suspicious' under my car ....... one of the risks of child protection work. image  image

    Last edited: 06 February 2018 18:36:53

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







Sign In or Register to comment.