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trees

Hello. I am planning an overhaul of my garden which is NNE facing, I want to plant a woodland garden. The garden is 140 feet long and 30 feet across and the soil is clay but has been improved over the last 10 to 15 years.

I want some small trees which I plan to plant in about two thirds of the garden but need to consider high winds and neighbours.

I love birch, hazel and holly but fear most species seem to grow a bit too tall. Even when looking at "dwarf" varieties I am faced with wide, tall trees.

Any ideas/suggestions?

Thanks! 

Posts

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,107

    Hazel can be coppiced, but you loose the flowers and nuts for some time after that

    Holly can be pruned to shape

    Birch loses all its beauty if it's hacked about.

    Some of the Crab apples arfe fairly small

    Hawthorn isn't a huge tree

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,688

    THIRTY FEET IS NOT A LOT WHEN YOU THINK OF THE CROWN OF A MATURE TREE SUCH AS A SYCAMORE. 

    I THINK YOU SHOULD GO AHEAD WITH YOUR IDEA BUT THINK MORE ALONG THE LINES OF A THICKET.

    GUELDER ROSE, HAWTHORN, SLOE, HAZEL, CRAB APPLE, ALDER AND HOLLY WOULD ALL SETTLE DOWN  NICELY INTO A BIRD-FRIENDLY, DENSE “WOODLAND” WHICH WOULDN’T CREATE SHADE OR DRY SOIL PROBLEMS FOR YOUR NEIGHBOURS.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,819

    Guelder rose or Viburnum opulus ; what an excellent recommendation ! Fresh new Spring foliage , usually excellent Autumn colouration plus the added bonus of brilliant red-fruits .

    Have you thought about Cornus mas ? Known as the Cornelian cherry (it's actually a dogwood); this bears yellow flowers on the bare wood in January/February . A good one for early pollinators ! Makes a medium sized tree eventually , but can be easily kept in check if need be .

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,741

    You have some good recommendations, and many suggested can be pruned and shaped. Hawthorns are great. The area isn't huge, so I think you should select trees that work hard and give interest back. Have a look at Cornus Alternifolia and Conversa. Flowers and an elegant shape. They have a less dense feel to them.

    Euonymus Europaeus, another shrub/tree that will not get too tall and easily managed. Again, full of interest throughout the year. And finally, if you have Cherry trees, do consider the understated Prunus Subhirtella 'Autumnalis'. This winter cherry will often start blossoming around November to December time. The pale blossoms literally cover the branches on and off for up to four months. Keeps the interest in the winter even in a woodland setting.

  • catnipcatnip Posts: 70

    Thank you so much for your wonderful recommendations- I wish my garden were a Tardis so I could fit everything in!!!

    Your suggestions will be considered and very much inform the planning/planting. In years to come, when it's all mature, I'll remember how it all stemmed from here!

    Thanks

  • Amelanchier is another good one and you could add a shrub rose or two at the woodland edge for some summer flowers and autumn hips too, if you choose the right ones. I have R. complicata and R. moyesii growing  under trees, Moyesii is  recommended  for its hips.

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,819

    Here's another one from my own garden but originally from my late fathers :-

    Aralia elata (Japanese Angelica tree) ; lovely grey spiny stems , huge pinnate leaves and fairly spectacular inflorescences in late summer , when a lot of other trees and shrubs are over .

    A good bee plant too!image

    Good luck with the planning !

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,819

    PS

    If you want a nice 'scrambling' rose to intertwine through it all , look at Rosa glauca ; pink and white small single flowers with glaucous blue foliage . Nice !

    Never seems to get any kind of disease either .

  • UpNorthUpNorth South Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK Posts: 364

    Would suggest some bare root trees at this time of year...a good way of bulking up your stock.  I've had a few things delivered from Jacksons (online) and they seem to have quite a selection....unless you want instant impact, then of course you're going to be paying £30 to £300 per tree!

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