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Help me Understand My Ficus

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  • treehugger80treehugger80 Posts: 1,923

    soak the root ball in some water and it will break down a bit, use your fingers to try and comb the roots to clear the clay and when you re pot spread the roots out

  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    treehugger80 says:

    soak the root ball in some water and it will break down a bit, use your fingers to try and comb the roots to clear the clay and when you re pot spread the roots out

    See original post

     Alright.

    I remembered something else. I had taken a cutting of another Ficus and put it in a pot. The thing had a couple of green leaves. One had fallen but then the other had stayed on firmly, so I thought it had taken hold. After the absence that cause the Ficus in pic to drop all its leaves, this cutting too had a strange turn. The sole leaf on it has turned almost white/colourless.

    Is this due to underwatering/drought too?

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,999

    I may be totally wrong here , but it looks like its been far too cold at some stage .

    F.microcarpa are tender plants and can only be grown outside for the summer months in the UK , even then in a very sheltered aspect away from cold winds .

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,218

    Paul .image  ... the OP is in India    "... At average temperature of 12-28C and 40% humidity, ..."

    Think that ought to be ok for it. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,999

    Yikes!!!!!!!!.....................I stand (or sit) corrected !image

    No fear of any frost then??image .

    Thanks for that Dove .

  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    Paul B3 says:

    Yikes!!!!!!!!.....................I stand (or sit) corrected !image

    No fear of any frost then??image .

    Thanks for that Dove .

    See original post

     Frost? lol The joke in my part of the country is that we don't have winters, just cooler summers. USDA Zone 11-12.

    Actually, my place is ideal for Ficus. You can't go down three blocks without seeing  a huge Religiosa or Bengalensis with 4-5ft diametre trunk and huge aerial roots. Most of the times they just germinate when birds shit out their seeds. In facr, they are considered pests because they grow on cracks and end up breaking walls in a house. Holy hell, they can' be get rid of without dousing it with acid.

    But as this Microcarpa proved, very finicky in a pot.

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,999

    Durrendal

    My embarassed apologies ; didn't realise you were in India ! image

    Your 'pest' Ficus species sound like they give the same problems as Buddleia does in the UK .

  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    Paul B3 says:

    Durrendal

    My embarassed apologies ; didn't realise you were in India ! image

    Your 'pest' Ficus species sound like they give the same problems as Buddleia does in the UK .

    See original post

     No apologies needed! I was just sharing an anecdote!

    Isn't Buddleia a bush?

    The main problem with Ficus as pests here is that it actually has cracked walls and foundations of many a house and kills off other plants by strangling. Even its sap is toxic a bit.

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,999

    http://japaneseknotweed.com/buddleia-faqs/

    I call it 'The Destroyer of Buildings' ; can be extremely invasive .

  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    Paul B3 says:

    http://japaneseknotweed.com/buddleia-faqs/

    I call it 'The Destroyer of Buildings' ; can be extremely invasive .

    See original post

     Oh wow. I saw a few pics and a bush filled with Buddleia looks very funny...like a buncha adult toys sticking out.xd

    Apologies for my off-kilter humour.

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