Help me Understand My Ficus

DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62

In conjunction with another open thread, I'm determined to find out what exactly happened to my Ficus. At this point, all the websites offer differing explanation on what's the cause so I'm really confused.

So, after I brought home a Ficus and repotted it, it would develop a new yellow leaf each day which dropped off with a little nudge. I watered the Ficus with little splashes and after the top layer dried out. I mean, I could smell Petrichor when I watered it each day.

image

So, what was it? Overwatering or Underwatering?

I thought it was overwatering, but then I had to leave for a week and then this happenedimage

So what is it?!

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,688

    Drought ... there's hardly any soil in that pot ... figs can cope with dry weather if they can get their roots down a long way ... if they're planted in the ground and looked after for a few years until they develop a good root system then they can reach down for moisture during dry spells.

    Your poor plant is in hardly any soil and what little there has been baked dry in the sun.

    Plants in pots need looking after ... they can't fend for themselves. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,688

    Further to my last post ... in future ... when you water a plant don't just give it little splashes ... that way the water doesn't get down to the roots ... give the pot a good soaking and then let it drain away..

    Don't water again until the soil an inch below the surface is feeling dry when you stick your finger in it.

    And when you plant your plants, fill the pot up to within a couple of inches from the rim of the pot ... your plant doesn't have enough soil to allow it to grow a good  root system to support the top growth.

    Use a potting medium that is a mixture of good soil plus some organic compost or well rotted manure, and some grit to aid drainage.  

    Hope that helps.

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    Dovefromabove says:

    Drought ... there's hardly any soil in that pot ... figs can cope with dry weather if they can get their roots down a long way ... if they're planted in the ground and looked after for a few years until they develop a good root system then they can reach down for moisture during dry spells.

    Your poor plant is in hardly any soil and what little there has been baked dry in the sun.

    Plants in pots need looking after ... they can't fend for themselves. 

    See original post

    So I have to water it more till the roots develop more?

    This one can still be saved right?

    Last edited: 30 January 2018 13:47:06

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,688

    I'm not hopeful ... but you might be lucky.  Move it to the shade and give it a good soaking and hope for the best.

    See my other post on watering and potting etc. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • treehugger80treehugger80 Posts: 1,915

    it also need some decent compost, not pure soil, it looked hungry before it dropped all its leaves.

    i would repot with some decent compost mixed with the existing soil and fill the pot up to the top and then give it a really good soak and hope for the best.

  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    treehugger80 says:

    it also need some decent compost, not pure soil, it looked hungry before it dropped all its leaves.

    i would repot with some decent compost mixed with the existing soil and fill the pot up to the top and then give it a really good soak and hope for the best.

    See original post

     I'll put some compost.

    A question though, how do I know if a plant looks hungry? I mean, what are the signs? I'd really like to know!

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,688

    The leaves turning pale and/or yellowish is usually a good clue ... but it's a bit late by the time you reach that stage ... if you're growing a plant in a pot then it's as dependent on you for its life as a bird in a cage ... you are responsible for giving it the right sort of soil which has the sort of drainage which suits it and containing the nourishment it needs, as well as enough water, but not too much.  

    Observation of your own plants and those belonging to other people is helpful. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    Dovefromabove says:

    The leaves turning pale and/or yellowish is usually a good clue ... but it's a bit late by the time you reach that stage ... if you're growing a plant in a pot then it's as dependent on you for its life as a bird in a cage ... you are responsible for giving it the right sort of soil which has the sort of drainage which suits it and containing the nourishment it needs, as well as enough water, but not too much.  

    Observation of your own plants and those belonging to other people is helpful. 

    See original post

     I had another inquiry. At average temperature of 12-28C and 40% humidity, is the Ficus drying out way too easy?

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,688

    What is the soil in the pot like an inch below the surface?  

    It's not just the temperature and humidity that governs the dryness of the soil ... the composition and s structure of the soil will have a bearing on how long it retains the water and how quickly it drains. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DurrendalDurrendal IndiaPosts: 62
    Dovefromabove says:

    What is the soil in the pot like an inch below the surface?  

    It's not just the temperature and humidity that governs the dryness of the soil ... the composition and s structure of the soil will have a bearing on how long it retains the water and how quickly it drains. 

    See original post

     Normal clay that breaks apart very easily and airy. The problem however is the clay the plant came in. That thing is so tough that after it dries, it actually retains any shape you can make out of it like plaster. I tried hard to break the clods but it'll just rip the roots. Right now there are just few root tendrils that have just started reaching the finer clay.

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