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Help with Identification Please

Hello

Can someone please help me to identify these three plants? I've recently bought a house and I'm trying to identify some of  the plants in the gardens.

Apologies for the poor quality photos. I tried to get the entire plant, the stems and leaves and any fruit for help in identification, but some were harder to photograph than others. (Some photos were taken back in November whilst still in leaf.)

The first three are of a small shrub? There are black berries that the birds haven't touched. It lost it's leaves this winter.

The next three are of a tree or shrub. It is currently just over 2 metres in height. The leaves have stayed on all winter. Some leaves are green, some yellow, some green and yellow. A few weeks ago I noticed tiny 'growths' not quite berries on the stems, I thought perhaps flowers? They were a bright orange, but the birds (or something) seems to have gotten to them as there are none left to photograph today. The trunk and stems seem to have a striped pattern which I tried to photograph.

The next two are of a large shrub, multi stemmed (also with a stripped pattern on the stems which doesn't photograph well). The leaves turned beautiful colours in the autumn (mostly red) before dropping. It is currently about 2 metres in height.

Thank you for your help!

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,794

    The first one looks like Lonicera japonica

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 7,647

    3rd. looks like a hazel of some sort.

    Time is never time at all
    You can never ever leave
    Without leaving a piece of youth
  • image Thank you Dovefromabove I hadn't considered a Lonicera Japonica. There are several of these plants around the garden and they're all quite small (about a foot in height). They have mostly lost their leaves this winter. I only moved house a few months ago, so I haven't seen the plant flower yet. So far, I keep finding these plants 'hidden' underneath other larger plants where they wouldn't be receiving any sun light. (I'm not sure if that might have affected their growth?)  I'm not sure if they were planted there purposely or have grown from 'wild' seed or something. 

  • image Thank you punkdoc I hadn't considered a hazel. I haven't seen this one in full leaf or flowering yet, so maybe that will help with identification. The leaves were falling when I moved in and now there are just bare branches. I was hoping to move this one, but trying to figure out what it is first. Thank you!

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,794

    Looking again ... the first one could also be a hypericum .... image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  •  I haven't considered that, but does a hypericum have black berries? 

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,794

    Yes, the type also known as Tutsan has red berries that turn black through the winter

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/st-johns-wort/tutsan-care-in-the-garden.htm 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,365

    I agree with Dovefromabove, the first three photos are Hypericum Androsaemum. The berries and stems make great cut flowers in the summer time. The 4th and 5th photos look like a Euonymus Japonicus shrub. Your particular one might be Aureus.

  • That's brilliant, thank you both! I keep finding loads of these around the garden, so I shall look forward to seeing those bright yellow flowers this summer. 

    I've just looked up Euonymus Japonicus and I think you are spot on there, so thank you! Now I know what I have I can better look after them! image

    The last photos, someone mentioned the plant might be a hazel? Is it possible for me to move that, and if so is it ok to move it now before the leaves come back? It's all stems at the moment, not a wide plant but the few stems there are about 2m in height. I'm worried how big the roots will be though! image

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,808

    Hello PPF

    If your hazel has 2m of growth on top , you're looking at quite a substantial root system also ; I would cut the stems to within a few cms. of the ground to conserve moisture before attempting a move .

    Hazels are exceptionally vigorous , and an established plant can easily generate a metre of growth a year .

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