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Renourishing compost in a planter

Last spring I decided to make a large planter (around 2.5m x 0.3m x 0.3m) out of a load of old wood that my neighbour didn't have any use for. I filled it with several bags of multi purpose compost bought from Lidl's and used it to house around 10 of my home grown chilli plants. All the chilli plants done well during the summer and spring and I ended up having really good results.

Am I correct in thinking that the chilli plants would have used up all the nutritional contents of the compost last year? If so what would be the best way to bring the compost back to life so that I can continue using it this year for a further crop of chilli's?   

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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

    If it were me I think I'd add well-rotted manure of some sort and some garden compost, and maybe a just a little BFB

    The old compost will be depleted after last season, the above mix should revive it
    Good luck for this years harvest

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,414

    Remove a few inches of the old compost from the top, and replenish with new compost plus a hand full of granular fertiliser. The goodness will wash down into the soil as you water. Once your plants are in and settled you can add more fresh compost to the top. If you are planting peppers again, dig out a hole and fill with fresh compost this should guard them from any disease from the last crop. I would never plant the same crop twice in the same place, just a thought.

    Frank.

  • Torg22Torg22 Posts: 302

    Ok thanks for the heads up!

    I've heard that before, why should you not plant the same crop 2 years in succession? Is it a recipe for disaster?

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

    Not disaster, but growing the same crop in the same soil you'll get a build-up of infections etc in the soil.
    A bit like growing toms in the greenhouse border - change the compost every 2-3 years then you'll keep it fresh.
    You should be ok this season but would suggest a fresh start next year.

    It's especially true for brassicas and is why crop rotation is used.

    Last edited: 26 January 2018 15:45:50

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • BLTBLT Posts: 525

    Yes I agree, I try to rotate things and I also replace the top 5 inches or so of tubs etc with new compost and also mix in a couple of hand fulls of Growmore or similar before re planting..

  • Mary370Mary370 Limerick, Ireland Posts: 2,003

    Pete8.......what is BFB?  

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

    Sorry  - Blood Fish and Bone meal - available at all garden centres.
    It's a slow release organic fertilizer that provides all the major nutrients for plants NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium)

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,532

    BFB is great - unless you have foxes. They will dig it out.

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

    and dogs - see my avatar.... she's healthy enough on it though :)

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Mary370Mary370 Limerick, Ireland Posts: 2,003

    OK thanks.  Would it be suitable for all plants and shrubs?  Or do roses require something else? 

    Last edited: 28 January 2018 11:50:58

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