Taking cuttings from my old rose

My daughter started school in 1998 and we planted a beautiful climbing rose "Schoolgirl" at the side of our patio doors.

It has consistently flowered prolifically for all this time until 2017 when the number of flowers was significantly lower in number, their quality wasn't as high and, towards the end of the year, we had a lot of disease (typically blackspot).

I really don't want to lose this plant, for both emotional and aesthetic reasons, so have two questions:

What can I do to bring it back to life?

How do I take cuttings - just in case?

Thanks

Andy

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,324

    How to take hardwood cuttings info here

    http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/grow-plants/how-to-take-hardwood-cuttings/ 

    That's how I propagate my roses.

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Thanks Dove from above. I shall attempt a cutting - something I Have never attempted with any plant before.

    Last edited: 21 January 2018 16:22:33

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,324

    Take several ... they won't all strike ... then leave them alone for 12 months, just ensuring the soil is kept damp during summer months. 

    Good luck image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,941

    I planted a bed of roses back in 1997/8 as well. Last year they started to show their age - didn't flower as well, bit of blackspot etc. I took the decision to replace them so fingers crossed for this year. Plants do outgrow themselves eventually I find. If all else fails you can still buy Schoolgirl.

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
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