Evergreen screening

Ron48Ron48 Posts: 1

One of the borders of my garden is a 1.5 metre high 20 metre long cornish stone hedge. I want to plant something on top of the hedge to increase the height by another metre, to make a screen. I live in Cornwall. Can anyone recommend fast growing evergreen plants that might might be suitable.

Posts

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 884

    "stone hedge" as the castle in the Riverlands http://gameofthrones.wikia.com/wiki/Stone_Hedge image

    I don't think you can actually grow evergreen plants growing up to 1 metre on top of a stone wall. Maybe I misunderstand your question.

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • glasgowdanglasgowdan Posts: 192

    I'd be tempted by buxus, yew, laurel or beech

  • I would think any hedge roots might eventually damage the structure of the original stone wall that could cause a lot of damage. Partcularly anything fast growing. 

    Is the stone wall yours and is it edging a road ?  Some of these are very old indeed and might be protected.  

    Read this you need to talk to the planning people and find out more.

    https://www.diynot.com/diy/threads/how-to-put-a-wooden-fence-on-a-cornish-stone-wall.259719/

  • WaysideWayside Posts: 460

    I've seen a yew happily seed itself on the top of a wall, behind wells cathedral.  So perhaps possible!  A stone wall with a soil mortar and living head piece is somewhat appealing.

  • I have seen a lot of Buddlias growing out of the top of a wall on platform 11 Crewe station. They will one day bring it down if nothing is done.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 43,644

    If it's only a metre in height that you need, wouldn't it be better and more feasible to grow native herbaceous perennials on the top of the Cornish hedge as is traditional ... I know they'll not be evergreen, but even in winter the dried stems and seedheads willl provide some screening effect (which is usually more important in the summer anyway).   They'll not damage the structure of the hedge as evergreen shrubs and trees would do. 

    My alternative would be bespoke willow fencing, woven in situ ... several examples of it being used to extend the height of a wall on this site  http://www.bramptonwillows.co.uk/fences.php 

    .... different sort of budget of course ... a lot more expensive than some foxglove, red campion, red valerian seeds. 

    No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
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