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  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 2,942

    Herding cats- trying to get 3 grand daughters out of the house on time!

    Sack full of monkeys!

    AB Still learning

  • pbffpbff Posts: 433

    How about 'As slow as a snail'. image

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 65,362

    Mischevious as a box of monkeys 

    Don't look a gift horse in the mouth 

    Waking at Cock's crow ...

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489

    You can take a horse to water but you can't make it drink.

    As wise as an owl.

    Ants in his pants.

    SW Scotland
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 65,362

    That old elephant in the room ... 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pbffpbff Posts: 433

    Cunning as a fox...

    As strong as an Ox

    Last edited: 11 January 2018 17:12:58

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  • pbffpbff Posts: 433

    Quiet as a church mouse

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  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489

    Breed like rabbits.

    Mad as a March hare.

    Doe eyed.

    Last edited: 11 January 2018 17:16:02

    SW Scotland
  • Dachalover - as happy as a pig in S**t is how I know it but I'll accept your rather more genteel versionimage  Problem is that pigs are not happy in that situation - they are clean animals when given the chance   They like to roll in mud as it helps to stop sun burning their delicate skin.  So why do we say that ?

    Obelixx - Larry - your explanation sounds feasible - do you have a date for that ? Yes, Norman French would always have been more refined - the grubby stuff came later.  I might try that "lets get back to our sheep" on my French friend.  Would you say that is still in common usage these days ?

    Joyce - haven't heard that one but I can get that.  I'd guess that "at the a**e end " is the less polite construction altho it doesn't actually mention an animal - mine not yoursimage

    Some are fairly obvious - a bull in a china shop eg. but what about a Pig in a Poke ?  We all know what it means but ????

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 22,759

    He was around in the late 1800s/early 1900s.  

    Pig in a poke comes from an early scam.  Suckling pigs were sold in closed bags, or pokes.  However, unscrupulous people often concealed a cat or a dog in there instead to fool the unwary buyer who didn't check the goods first.  This trick was then discovered by "letting the cat out of the bag".

    Simples.

    Last edited: 11 January 2018 17:20:36

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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