Photinia Red Robin and Leyenddii Mixed Hedge

Hi everyone! 

I love the leyenddi  cypress and the photinia  Red Robin as hedges or screening - we have 21 m to fill has anyone has experience mixing the two  into a blended hedge or can it even be done?  

I love the idea of it but I'm not sure of the species blend or practicality. 



  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 1,429


    The 'Leylandii' will literally smother the Photinia 'Red Robin' over time ! These conifers are erroneously still planted by many garden owners ; much to their regret later on . Best avoided .image

    'Red Robin' is an attractive shrub in its own right  . Pruning can be tricky as dieback may well occur if too drastic (i.e squarely cut) . If planted and then left to develop naturally , but keeping straggly growth under control , I can't forsee any major problems .

    There is available another Photinia, called ( Stranvaesia) davidiana 'Palette' ; this is an attractive variegated form bearing red berries , cream,green and red leaves and good Autumn colouration too .

    Could form an interesting association as a hedge .

    PS :- Both forms appreciate a good fertile loamy soil , maybe even slightly acidic and moist for optimum growth image

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 1,303

    I agree with Paul B3's comments there. Apart from (my opinion) the fact that they don't blend as a mixed hedge, the Leylandii would very soon take over. Although a well planted Photinia would grow strongly, but planted next to Leylandii, there is no contest.

    Photinia's are best planted as a natural looking barrier rather than shaped. The leaves are huge and the shrub has a tendency to grow loosely and even with regular pruning, they still tend to grow more rounded in shape. 

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 10,178

    I agree.  Forget the leylandii.  Dreadful stuff that looks dull all year, sucks the life out of the soil and offers nothing to wildlife.

    On the other hand, I have seen photinia Red Robin used to great effect as narrow, formal hedging in the gardens at Annevoie in Belgium - the red tinged hedges in this photo -   Every time they're clipped they make new red growth.

    I have some mere, inherited in a mixed informal hedge along with viburnum, philadelphus, choisya, weigelia and others.  Love it.

    The Vendée, France
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