Greenhouse lighting

I've just ordered some lights for my Vitopod propagator to go into my heated greenhouse. I've also ordered a timer. How many hours and which hours should I have the lights on for?

Thanks

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Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,502

    Lights should be on for around 14-18 hrs per day.
    Your plants still need 6-10 hours darkness a day too.
    Timing is up to what suits you, so long as they get proper dark for 8-10hrs they'll be happy with those sort of timings.

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Depends what you are growing, where you live and what aspect for your GH ?

    A bit more info may result in some useful adviceimage

  • Pete: Thanks.

    Phillipa: I live in Kent, the 6' x 8' greenhouse has a south aspect. Will be planting seeds for bedding plants and tomatoes.

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,158

    Why don’t you just wait for Natures Own, she will supply the right heat and light for anything you want to grow. You can’t plant any of out until May or June anyway. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,502
    Lyn says:

    Why don’t you just wait for Natures Own, she will supply the right heat and light for anything you want to grow. You can’t plant any of out until May or June anyway. 

    See original post

     As far as light is concerned I very much agree.
    It's all very well germinating seeds and growing them on in artificial conditions in a propagator, but as I found, if you have 100+ 6" tender plants in 3" pots in the middle of Feb you'll need a lot of lights and warmth to keep them going until frosts have passed
    If it's a few houseplants or it's an experiment, then why not?

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Hi Lyn

    Many thanks for your view.

  • The greenhouse id heated to a min of 50F and these are the units: http://www.greenhousesensation.co.uk/vitopod-lights-support-kit.html

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,158

    There are a lot of people who think they’ll get an early start by usIng artificial heat and light, try it, you may be lucky if you’ve loads of greenhouse space to keep them In when you pot them on. 

    Bedding plants and tomatoes can be sown in March, then they’re just about the right size to plant out end of May begining of June. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Thanks for the thoughts, clearly you're right about normal bedding plants but I want to experiment.

    My lights have just arrived. Would people like me to report back later in the year on how I got on?

    Thanks again,

    Derek

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,502

    I'd be keen to hear how you get on Derek.

    I tried a few years ago with an old set-up from my tropical fish tank. I had 4 x 50W T5 4ft tubes at the correct wavelength (i.e. mostly blue/red light) and also have a Vitopod and another propagator and a 4ftx2ft heated mat.

    Plants grew well and quickly with little stretch but as I mentioned above I then had well over 100 plants to keep frost free and with sufficient light.
    I sort of managed that, but the cosmos just got to silly heights and the tomatoes and peppers just got too big too quickly - then it's trying to get the canopy at an even height so that the light can penetrate - so some pots on bricks etc.

    It was a lot of effort and to be honest I didn't see any particular benefits. The tomatoes started producing maybe a week or so earlier and the cosmos were about 4ft tall and flowering well in their pots by April.

    Good luck!

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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