The Snail Lover's Society

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Posts

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 2,047

    A casserole of snails? image

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,511

    A squidge of snails.

    Sorry, don't like them in my treasures or in garlic butter but I don't go round poisoning them cos I don't want to harm their natural predators.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,216

    The snail, it slithers, hither and thither

    .

    It meets up with others to huddle together

    They cuddle and mate, we see what they ate

    but no need for mass slaughter with bait.

    SW Scotland
  • pbffpbff Posts: 432

    Good morning fellow Snail Lovers,

    Haven't been on the Forum for a couple of days due to the snow and ice preventing travel into town (shall post some photos on the Weather thread later) - I don't think many snails would have been about this week!

    Thanks for all your entries so far - not exactly sure that some of them fit with the Membership Code of Conduct mind, especially words such as 'crunch' and 'casserole'...image

    PF, absolutely love your snail photo - a squeeze would certainly be a very apt collective noun for this little group!

    Joyce - I think your poem is totally brilliant and does an excellent job of representing what our Society stands for. image

    Any more ideas for collective nouns for snails at all? image

  • pbffpbff Posts: 432

    I came across an interesting article about snails using weapons today - maybe Linda Taylor2 was right to be worried about them taking over the world!!image

    Researchers from Japan's Hokkaido University and Tohuku University, along with colleagues from the Russian Acadamy of Sciences, found that some snail species counterattack predators by swinging their shells - it had previously been thought that snails only protected themselves by withdrawing into their shells.

    The researchers were studying snails from the genus Karaftohelix in both Japan and Russia and observed each species' defensive behaviour against their predator, the carabid beetle.

    They found that two species, Karaftohelix (Ezohelix) gainesi in Hokkaido, Japan and K. selskii in the Far East region of Russia - swing their shell like a club to hit and knock over the carabid beetles; whilst other closely related species simply withdraw into their shells and wait until the attacker gives up.

    The researchers reported that the difference in their defensive behaviours was reflected in the shell shapes.

    By analyzing DNA from each species, they found that the two active-or-passive defence methods evolved independently in the Japanese and Russian species. 

    The full report can be found here: https://www.nature.com/articles/srep35600

    We will have to watch out for our Garden Snails forming this sort of technology against us!!imageimageimage

    Karaftohelix (Ezohelix) gainesi

    image

    Last edited: 13 December 2017 13:31:23

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,339

    A handsome beast.  I especially like the elegant shading on the antennae.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,511

    I used to teach English conversation to Belgian scientists who often had strange views about growing native weeds to attract pollinators and were astonished too see So many on my "imports" including clematis, hardy geraniums and a sedums spectabile with 4 different wild honey bees on one flower head.

    One of the scientists carefully nurtured all the "petits gris" - pretty stripey snails - he found in his garden.  They are a local delicacy and also grew his own garlic for the butter............

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • pbffpbff Posts: 432

    image

    Trochulus striolatusthe Strawberry Snail, is on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species at the category of 'Least Concern'.

    The species is widespread from Hungary to northern France and the British Isles (except Shetland).

    The population is thought be currently stable.

    The Strawberry Snail has a rather flattened (low spire) shell, measuring about 6.5 - 9 mm high and 11-15 cm wide, with six convex whorls. The growth ridges on the shell are very prominent.The shell varies between a brown or reddish-brown. Light brown spots/flecks may be visible. Shells of juveniles are hairy, but the adults are hairless.

    The Strawberry Snail is a garden pest image and typical of habitats disturbed by humans. It is locally abundant in woodland, scrub, waste ground, around old buildings and gardens and is found within sites typically concentrated in nettle beds or along old walls.

    Local sub-populations may be threatened by the complete or severe destruction of the vegetation (deforestation followed by erosion, fire, etc.), but considering the large extent of the occurrence and the large number of sub-populations, local events would be unlikely to significantly affect the whole population.

    The species is native in Britain, but has become much more common through human activity, continuing to expand its range in Scotland where it was rare in the 1930s.

    It is listed as 'Rare' in Bavaria, and 'Low Concern' in Switzerland and Ireland.

    The species is protected in Hungary.

    Lots of potential Snail Lover's Society members in Hungary then, perhaps? image

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • pbffpbff Posts: 432
    pbff says:
    image

     

    The Strawberry Snail has a rather flattened (low spire) shell, measuring about 6.5 - 9 mm high and 11-15 cm wide, with six convex whorls. The growth ridges on the shell are very prominent.The shell varies between a brown or reddish-brown. Light brown spots/flecks may be visible. Shells of juveniles are hairy, but the adults are hairless.

    See original post

     

    CORRECTION, THIS SHOULD READ: 'The Strawberry Snail has a rather flattened (low spire) shell, measuring about 6.5 - 9 mm high and 11 - 15 mm wide, with six convex whorls.' image

    Tip of the week: always proof-read posts at least twice

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