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I have be been to seen a garden recently with a few hundred meters of yew hedgeing. some of is thrivin very but more is a yellowish brown colour and appears to be struggling and some of it has completely died. Now all the soil appears to be similar and dryish.  I have no experience with yew hedging as it is not common planted round my way. Any advice would be great. Thanks

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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,561

    I'm afraid I find this post a bit baffling.   Can you give some more information?

    Do you want to know why the hedge you saw looks the way it does or do you want to fix or maybe plant one of your own?

    Where are you?   Yew hedging is quite common in Britain and this is a British based forum with a few posters in Canada Europe, Oz, Russia, SA and USA so a wide range of experience, soils and climate.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Yew is a slow growing plant so can take a while to get established and you need to get top quality plants from the nursery to avoid losses, so it is not cheap. It's not that difficult but must never dry out. Be patient and you will have a fine hedge. This is a good time of year  to plant them. Good luck. Ian

    Last edited: 15 November 2017 21:23:57

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  • Bernard-2 says:

    Hi all I am looking for some advice. I am a landscaper based in the south of Ireland.I have be been to see a customer garden recently with a few hundred meters of yew hedgeing. Some of it is thriving very well and is a good dark green and healthy colour and had some fine strlong fresh growth this past year but more of it is a yellowish brown colour and appears to be struggling and some of it has even completely died. Now all the soil appears to be of a similar good quality and well drained but not dry. I have no experience with yew hedging as it is not common planted round my way.i have only ever seen it planted in some state owned garden and the botanic gardens and grave yards. I know it's more common in Britain so im hoping some of may be able to get me some advice on it. That would be great. Thanks. (Sorry about the previous message I'm no good with computers)

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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,561

    It may well have been stressed.  Last winter was very dry for many areas in Britain and northern Europe and some of us still haven't had any decent rain.  Is that the case in your part of Ireland?

    If so, a good soaking at the roots and maybe a scattering of bonemeal at the roots to help them over winter will sort out the problem.   The RHS advice page on yews says they usually recover if the problem is stress - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=729 

    Are any other plants near the struggling sections also in trouble or just the yew?

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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