Plant based screen ideas?

I have a 17 metre walled banking at the top of my garden which is roughly 2 meters wide. Until recently conifers were the backdrop of the banking with a mixture of perennials and evergreens. The neighbour who's garden this backs on to cut the conifers right back to their trunks on my side.

Initially I was going to put a 17 x 2 metre feathered edge fence in front of the conifers to hide the shabbiness that has been left behind with bare trunks etc on display and then to use the new space that I have to plant some small trees (acers etc). However, given that the confers are still there I think it would be a struggle to get fence posts down due to the amount of roots. 

I was wondering if anyone had some ideas for on what I could use to make a plant screen or another way to hide the base of the trunks. I was considering some tall grasses or many bamboos that would give the bed a backdrop and structure to then plant  some small trees and cordylines etc in front of that, but behind the existing perennials which are at the front? 

Thanks in advance! 

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Posts

  • correct me if i'm wrong, but behind those conifers is a fence, which makes the conifers yours not your neighbours?

    if that's the case, i'd be tempted to rip out the conifers and replace with a decent fence and grow climbers on it.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 16,256

    And, if those are your neighbour's conifers, why did you let them leave you with such an eyesore?

    If you can't get fence posts in it's unlikely plants will be able to get their roots down far enough to thrive.  Those conifers will have sucked all the nutrients and moisture out of the soil too.   If you can't take them all out for some reason I suggest you try and erect a plastic covered, wire mesh fence with thin metal posts which will be easier to bang in to the depth you need then add the mesh which can be flexible diamond weave mesh or rigid rectangles.  Do this right up against the bare trunks or as close as possible.

    After a good downpour, pile on a good thick layer of well-rotted manure and leave it over winter for weather, worms and micro-organisms to work in and then plant some good climbers such as clematis, honeysuckle, rambling or climbing roses which can cling to or be tied in to your fence so they grow to cover it.   

    You will need to make decent planting holes for them to thrive and water and mulch them well.  If that's not possible then a mixture of ornamental grasses, verbena bonariensis and other tall perennials and spring bulbs will provide interest and a disguise.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • treehugger80 says:

    correct me if i'm wrong, but behind those conifers is a fence, which makes the conifers yours not your neighbours?

    if that's the case, i'd be tempted to rip out the conifers and replace with a decent fence and grow climbers on it.

    See original post

     Unfortunately not, that is his raised bed that you can see. 

  • Obelixx says:

    And, if those are your neighbour's conifers, why did you let them leave you with such an eyesore?

    If you can't get fence posts in it's unlikely plants will be able to get their roots down far enough to thrive.  Those conifers will have sucked all the nutrients and moisture out of the soil too.   If you can't take them all out for some reason I suggest you try and erect a plastic covered, wire mesh fence with thin metal posts which will be easier to bang in to the depth you need then add the mesh which can be flexible diamond weave mesh or rigid rectangles.  Do this right up against the bare trunks or as close as possible.

    After a good downpour, pile on a good thick layer of well-rotted manure and leave it over winter for weather, worms and micro-organisms to work in and then plant some good climbers such as clematis, honeysuckle, rambling or climbing roses which can cling to or be tied in to your fence so they grow to cover it.   

    You will need to make decent planting holes for them to thrive and water and mulch them well.  If that's not possible then a mixture of ornamental grasses, verbena bonariensis and other tall perennials and spring bulbs will provide interest and a disguise.

    See original post

     I didn't appreciate how far he was going to back, I initially thought a fence would be ok when we discussed it but my gardener believes it would be a hell of a job to get the posts in (admittedly I haven't tried yet). 

    Grasses and Verbenas would be a preference, do you think that they would take hold in that location?

    thanks again.  

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,224

    It would probably be a helluva job, but not impossible with the right tools and a couple of people who know what they're doing ... my builder did a similar job for me but he's done similar jobs before and knew what he was taking on.  

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 16,256

    If you improve the soil, grasses and verbena should take well.   Put a mulch on now for winter magic to happen then more in spring and plant it up.  Don't plant now tho.  Wait till winter rains and the worst of the frosts are over.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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