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Moving Buddhlia

peweukpeweuk Posts: 28

We have a mature buddhlia (not sure of age) - seen here

image

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We want to move it to our new garden. How/when do we tackle this.

Here's a closer look at the base.

image

Last edited: 12 November 2017 18:03:14

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Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,639

    You can move it now or a little later. Best to cut down all those tall branches and they will do better in settling down in the new garden.

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,152

    CUTTINGS ARE DEAD EASY TO DO

    Trim off the lower leaves from a fresh shoot such as that in the top image keeping a single mature pair. Have one trimmed leaf joint and at least a centimetre of stem below the leaf joint (black arrow) to plant under the surface as this is where most roots will form from the undifferentiated cells in the stem. Ensure the end cut in clean by using a very sharp knife, (red arrow).

    image

    AND A GOOD BACKUP IN CASE OF FAILURE OF THE OLD PLANT.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,964

    Looking at that base , I think you may struggle to move it without serious damage .

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 15,872

    I would take any suitable cuttings. Its the wrong time of year, but I've done a few today of a Bx weyerana.  When they have roots, decide whether you want to move it or plant a new one. A younger plant will do best.

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,320

    I agree with Paul, i doubt that will survive being moved.

    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • I agree with Pansy, I would definitely take some cuttings just as she has described - they root very easily.  I would fill a pot with half a dozen cuttings and check them in the Spring for root growth.  Try digging up the parent plant if you want to with as much root on it as possible and water it often over the next few months until it has established - but as suggested do prune it first.

  • peweukpeweuk Posts: 28

    Thanks for all the answers - we have decided to leave it where it is and have ordered a new one - a lovely tricolour shrub.

    image

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,320

    Not sure whether you really want to know this, but that is not a single shrub, but 3 different shrubsimage

    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,387

    punkdoc is right. Just one of the many misleading photos on the net.

    PS. I think your shrubs is too big to move and a new one (or 3) is in order.

    Experiments show me the bees are not as keen on the white ones as they are the purple

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 15,872

    That tricolour looks beautiful.  A marvel of photoshop. Even with three different colours planted in one pot, it ain't gonna look like that. Different colours have different growth habits as well. I have a wild pale purple type, the butterflies love, up at 18ft, and a white one they ignore at 6ft.

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
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