Forum home Fruit & veg

F1 Apache Chilli Pepper

hutchmanhutchman Ringwood. Hampshire. UKPosts: 39

Hi all,

I have grown a F1 Chilli pepper plant this year and the resulting crop has been very successful

I am storing the crop by the hanging method (same as Onion stringing) - so that air will circulate and keep them dry in my garage. 

On checking them over today the skins are looking clean and bright red, and no sign of disease etc but I find the fruits are very soft....almost 'squidgy' in texture

I opened one up to check inside and all seemed as should be, no sign of problem.

Can anybody verify if this the norm ???

Thanks in appreciation

Posts

  • I used to dry my Cayenne chillis by threading cotton thread through the fruit just below the stalk and hanging them in the airing cupboard. I'd put 10 or a dozen on each string and space them so they didn't touch each other.  As they dried, it was simple enough to adjust the spacing until completely dry.

    The consistent warm temperature and dry atmosphere helped them to dry slowly and thoroughly.  

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,150

    I dry chillis the same way as Philippa, with a needle and thread through the stalks.  Don't have an airing cupboard though, I hang them on the fridge with magnets ?.

  • hutchmanhutchman Ringwood. Hampshire. UKPosts: 39

    Thanks to Ps2 & K 2 for your responses

    Can I ask either of you - how is the texture of your chillis when storing - does the fruit remain 'hard' or does it change to soft (as mine has !!) and does it have an effect on the usage for cooking / eating

    As said before the skin colour remains deep red and with a waxy feel, so am hoping that there is not a problem in continuing storage and also using

    Appreciate advice from anyone with previous knowledge of this

    Thanks again 

  • I haven't grown Apache - are they chubby or thin ?

    If chubby fruit, they will obviously take longer to dry than the slender ones such as Cayenne.

    Drying chillis shouldn't really go soft - a gradual wrinkling would probably be the best way to describe it.

    If the fruit are chubby ( or short and fat - however you want to describe it ? ) - you could halve them down the length and dry as described above.  The main thing is an even dry temp to ensure thorough drying before you store them for future use.

    You can also freeze the whole fruit - pick when ripe, bag and straight into the freezer.  This method obviously limits your use - ie once out of the freezer, need using straight away  but you could use both methods.

  • hutchmanhutchman Ringwood. Hampshire. UKPosts: 39

    Thanks Ps2

    Not sure how to describe, certainly not huge. Checkout link for size viewing

    http://vegetalis.com/products/pepper-hot/chilli-pepper-apache

    These are exactly how mine are to look at, even now after having them hang stored for some time.

    Its just the softness of the texture I'm concerned and unsure about

    As I said earlier, did cut one open and checked the flesh inside and also the seeds and all seemed fine.

    I even tasted ??? a small amount on the tongue to see ok - which seemed to be - although VERY HOT to the tastebuds

    I may do as you've suggested, thanks once again 

  • Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 3,189

    I'm drying Apache, mine are a little soft, they haven't dried as well or as quickly this yr. I hang them upside down in the kitchen.

    The majority have stayed red as usually but some have gone orange they usually don't go this colour unless they are stored for too long. I've been known to have dried apache chillies stored for up to two yrs ?

  • Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 3,189

    I've frozen some this yr, they look ok, don't know how long they keep in the freezer...

  • hutchmanhutchman Ringwood. Hampshire. UKPosts: 39

    Thank you Zoomer44

    Based on your information i think i'm ok with these then.

    Don't think our stock will last that long knowing the way my wife likes to cook with them

    Thanks again

Sign In or Register to comment.