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Queens Park, Craig y Don.

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  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 6,492
    I confused myself about the date...  but I saw your beautiful park tonight, Josusa - congratulations on the gold!  You live in a lovely place.   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • PurplerainPurplerain Posts: 1,052
    Congratulations on Gold! I saw the Todmorden one too @Liriodendron. That was good,  but a shame about the hot weather.
    SW Scotland
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 7,149
    Congratulations @josusa47, a great effort by everyone concerned. 
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,527
    It was on last night, the schedule was changed to accommodate a sporting event. 
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 7,149
    I was very impressed by the school children @josusa47. The beekeeping and keeping of chickens etc. I wish more children had the chance to do that, they are very lucky  :)
  • GWRSGWRS Posts: 7,527
    Very impressed with your Community Spirit long May it continue 
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,527


    These two set up home in the park in November, I've only just remembered to post them on the forum.  As our neighbourhood is called Craig-y-Don, we have called the top one Craig and the one in the hole Don. 

    They are the work of Mark Earp, if you google his name you can see more of his work on his Facebook page.

  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 6,492
    Those are lovely, @josusa47.  He has a real skill!   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,527

    Lots going on at the park the last few weeks.  Here are some of our volunteers saying Diolch yn Fawr, thank you very much, to Calor Gas for awarding us a grant of £2,500 from their community fund, to replace the outworn safety matting under some of the play equipment.  Lots of community groups had applied for grants, and Calor Gas put all the proposals to a public on-line vote.  So we chivvied all our friends and relations to vote for us, and we came out on top.


    Our Victorian drinking fountain is sadly no longer functional.  We asked the council if we could get it restored to working order, but were not allowed for fear of legionnaire's disease.  Still, it's quite a handsome landmark, with a Bible verse inscribed above the water outlet - Jesus' words to the woman at the well, about "living water".  So we suggested to a local church they might like to clean it up and remove the dirt and lichen that were obscuring the lettering.  That was done one balmy evening, with a couple of the park volunteers joining in, and we made quite a difference - this is the "before" picture.

    The Calor Gas result came out just in time for us to announce it at the Party in the Park, our annual summer fete, in which the local beekeepers took part for the first time.  Peter went home pleased with the day, having sold all his honey.  Lots of local charities and businesses took part, the sun came out after a drizzly morning, everyone had lots of fun and we raised over £2k for the park funds.

    Some of that came from people paying £1 to guess the name of the boat.  This outworn dinghy was freshly painted and presented to us by a local children's hospice.  We are calling her "Crest of a Wave".  We bought in a few tons of topsoil and the council nursery supplied the plants.  We are having a brass plaque engraved and when that's ready we will have a naming ceremony.

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,527
    Death struck in the park this morning.  I was pulling out spent annuals from a border when a cacophony of cawing broke out behind me.  I turned to see the air full of jackdaws, wheeling and swooping and making a din all around the trees.  I didn't see the strike, but saw on the ground what looked like a big bird, which I gradually resolved into two birds, predator and prey.  The poor jackdaw took about five minutes to die, flapping and struggling.  Hardly surprising as it was quite a bit bigger than the predator.  I couldn't get close enough to see what the slender little hawk was.  It had just begun plucking its meal when two little children, who hadn't noticed it, came a bit too close and off it flew.  So poor jackdaw died for nothing.  C'est la guerre.
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