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What is this, please?

LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,797

I probably need to dig it up regardless, but the question is - do I want to replant it somewhere else? The young leaves are rather nice. 

image

Here's the branching habit. It's growing over a Solomon's Seal.

image

'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
- Cicero
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  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,797

    I can't find the blushing emoticon, but just after I posted this enquiry, I spotted this:

    image

    So I think you're right!

    Just need to look up it's habit and see if I can find a home for it somewhere else. I don't think either of my neighbours have it so maybe a bird passed it on.

    Thank you.

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • CloggieCloggie Posts: 1,394

    image It needs a bit of space LG the L, here's a mature specimen, it's the one in front of the hedge, middle left of the photo.  That's a mature pampas grass in the foreground and there's an 8x10 shed behind the hedge.  The tree is apple.  Hope this is helpful.

  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,797

    Hmmm. I wonder if i should put it in a pot and donate it to the nearby charity plant stall instead? I don't really have room for that, especially as - although I do think it's quite attractive - it's not something I would have sought out.

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • CloggieCloggie Posts: 1,394

    I think it's an acquired taste LG.  I inherited it and at times in the last 3(ish) years it has looked fabulous.  My friend at work took it out saying it was a bully (his plot was I think 33' x 100' - Victorian long and thin).  When I moved in it was reedy and thin and I wondered if it was in the right place and not getting enough sun.  I cut it to the ground and the year after it was nondescript (I think this is when I took the above photo which was actually of the revamp of the sandpit).  The next season, it was fabulous, loved it and so did the birds.  This season it looks a bit wan and shabby and I'm thinking of cutting it back to the ground again.  It does smother things planted beneath it.  

    Hope this is helpful.

  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,797

    It is very helpful, thank you. My garden is similar to your colleague's - a few feet longer and a few narrower. I know I couldn't bring myself to dump it - it's a healthy plant - but I can bring myself to pass it on I think. There's an 'honesty shop' round the corner - basically the woman who lives there puts plants all along her front garden wall, with prices on, and if you want one you put the money through the letterbox. All proceeds to the local hospice.  I've had a good few from there, I'll donate this one back and hopefully it'll make a couple of quid image.

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • CloggieCloggie Posts: 1,394

    Sounds lovely, what a nice idea.  We have a wee plant shop in our village that has an honesty box but next to it I saw a sign that said, "CCTV in operation, we know who you are, pay for your Rose!".  LOL  I wondered if the Rose thief ever 'fessed up! image 

  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,797

    Yes, it's always a risk. I think, judging by the amount she's raised (she has a litle noticeboard with the latest tally on it) not much goes missing. Considering it's in a pretty busy corner of South London, there's not much one could do to stop thieves if they wanted to help themselves - but most people respond well to the 'honesty shop' ethos I think. There *was* one occasion a while ago when a couple of larger, more expensive plants went walkies. She posted about it on the local Facebook group and loads of people popped more than enough money to cover the loss through her letterbox! 

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • BiljeBilje Posts: 670

    I have a bird gifted one that is hard by a Hawkshead fushia. I couldn't split them so left them to get on with it. The get pruned to ground level in Spring. The interwoven flowering stems are delightful. 

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 18,379

    Thanks for the tip about cutting it right down, mine got so tall this year some of it fell over.

    Dordogne and Norfolk
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