Forum home Plants

What is the best Clematis to grow up a Yew

I have two large Yews in my garden which form the entry to the lower part of the garden.  I would like some more colour so would like to plant a clematis on either side to grow through the Yew.   Its a south facing garden, with clay soil and my colour scheme is white and some purple. If it grew in the Yew it may be tricky to prune. I'd like something which would flower twice a year.  Long list I know but which would you recommend?

Thank you!

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,576

    If you want twice a year it needs pruning in between.

    If you go for a viticella or other group 3 you'll get flowers most of the summer and can just prune it all to the base every March or even late autumn if you want to remove the dead and dormant stems once the leaves drop.

    i suggest Huldine which, tho it may take a year or two to get its feet down and establish, will be vigorous enough to grow thru or over tall yews and the flowers - white with a vein of purple on teh back - will be perfect for your colour scheme.

    http://www.clematis.hull.ac.uk/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=20 

    You'll need to make it a decent, deep planting hole and enrich te soil with plenty r moisture retentive well-rotted manure and garden compost and then water and feed it well to establish it.   Bury it a few inches lower than it was in its pot and tease out its roots gently to encourage them to seek nutrients and extra flwoering stems to grow.   Feed generously with clematis food every spring and give occasional liquid feeds of rose or tomato food through till mid summer. 

    Clematis are hungry, thirsty plants so make sure there is some space between them and the yews to reduce competition form the yew.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Thank you - I'll go for the Huldine it appears to tick all the boxes!! I'm ordering now so hopefully it's fine planted at this time of the year for (hopefully) some flowers next year?

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,576

    Most perennial plants are best planted in autumn while the soil is still warm and theer's moisture.  Add a bit of bonemeal to the soil and maybe sprinkle some microrhizal fungae directly on the roots to help it off to a good start.

    I grew this one in my last garden and loved it

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • image

    Good luck with the Huldine, this is a flower in our garden last Summer, this year no flowers.

    This happens quite often, I have tried different pruning and feeding regimes but still not cracked the code !!

    I think I read somewhere that Raymond Evison said that there is 2 different clones of Huldine.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,576

    This article says the same thing Richard ad indicates that plenty of sunshine helps - http://www.clematis.hull.ac.uk/iclsframe.cfm?page=page22

    Not a  plant for a shady aspect then.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Thanks for the reference, Obelixx.  The fact that Huldine was raised by Morel and the upward facing flower, suggests that possibly clematis texensis is in the pedigree. Some of the texensis hybrids, Gravetye Beauty, Sir Trevor Lawrence, have the same flowering difficulty up here in Lancashire.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,576

    Not just Lancashire.  My Huldine in Belgium had good years and bad years but always some flowers and they are lovely.

    Very few clems on sale round here but if I find a Huldine I'll plant it and let you know how it does in sunshine.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,148

    I'm just wonderinghow often the yew needs cutting and how that will affect the choice.

    Do you do the yews a couple of times a year Jackie, or can you get away with a once a year tidy? The clematis you choose will need to fit in with that too, or it might get a bit tricky!   image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,576

    Good question FG.   Yew are usually trimmed in late summer to autumn and the latter time would not affect a group 3 clematis as they flower on new growth made from spring.

    Renovative pruning for yews - hard pruning in effect - is best done in spring which would also give a group 3 clem time to do its thing.   Fond memories of Chris Beardshaw in Hidden Gardens hacking the bejabers out of a yew hedge.  Pity we never got a return visit to see the results.  Time for another series to catach up?

    In case of doubt, this is what the RHS says - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=729 

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
Sign In or Register to comment.