Replanting new hedge

Having just cut down an overgrown holly hedge I am hoping the stumps will generate new growth.

However I also want to plant a new laurel hedge in front of these to screen them as they're unsightly at present.

My intention is to dig a trench a few feet in front of them and plant the laurel there.

The alternative is to grub out the holly stumps and roots (they're 70 years old!) which would be a big expensive job!

Posts

  • I would let the holly come back, as long as you've left a bit of a stump and not taken them to ground level they'll come back.

    I wouldn't plant laurel as in a couple of years when the holly is back up you'll have to dig them out, and holly's that old will put on a significant amount of growth next year - up to three or four feet if you give them a good feed in spring. what about smaller shrubs that could be left once the holly is back up to height? or even herbaceous perennials?

    is there something behind the holly's like a fence or a wall that you could grow a climber over if its open could you put some temporary fencing in front of the holly until it grows back up

    Last edited: 27 September 2017 11:01:25

  • Thanks for your advice, Treehugger.

     I have left around 2 feet so hopefully they will sprout from there.  You rapid growth assessment is encouraging.

    Have you any thoughts about the eventual shape

  • finchcroft- sorry to jump in on this post...

    I'm in a similar position myself. I am surrounded by mature hedging (all beech, except one run of privet). The privet has been neglected and grown very leggy; about 4ft high with some foliage on top. I have cleared the existing hedge of vigorous ivy, as well as clearing out all dead wood as a result, but want to plant a line of beech in front to match the rest of the garden. Am i asking for trouble, given the privet is mature? 

    Not an option to remove privet. As much as i would love to, it would cost a fortune.

    Dan

  • Dan,

    plant the beech as close to the privet as you can and keep the privet trimmed until the beech has grown to the size you want (you will need to water and feed the beech every summer as privet is a thirsty plant),

    when it has grown to the desired size you can cut the privet back to the ground in about May/June time and use SBK (a type of weed killer - short for stump and brushwood killer) CAREFULLY on the exposed cut stems, this will kill the privet and then you don't have to dig the root out.

  • finchcroft,

    Holly can be trained quite well, I would aim for a hedge with a batter to it, this means it is narrower at the top and wider at the bottom. it doesn't have to be dramatic difference (it could be at little a 6 inches wider at the bottom than the top) but it helps the bottom of the hedge stay slightly thicker and gives the hedge a more uniform look.

    If you've left the stumps 2 foot tall then you could go with a hedge as low as three feet, or as high as 20 feet given time. Just remember that it won't now grow until spring, so you will have some bare stems for a while.

  • treehugger80 says:

    Dan,

    plant the beech as close to the privet as you can and keep the privet trimmed until the beech has grown to the size you want (you will need to water and feed the beech every summer as privet is a thirsty plant),

    when it has grown to the desired size you can cut the privet back to the ground in about May/June time and use SBK (a type of weed killer - short for stump and brushwood killer) CAREFULLY on the exposed cut stems, this will kill the privet and then you don't have to dig the root out.

    See original post

     Thanks for the info, much appreciated!

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