Trellis Designs

Having seen a number of trellis designs, I feel that the one I took over when moving here 20 years ago takes some beating. I have not seen this design anywhere else before and thought that it may be of interest to others who have a smallish garden, with or without a central feature such as a pool or patioimageimage.

Having just rebuilt the major part of the trellis I reduced the number of posts in order to avoid trying to replace the ones which were in the centre of hedges, but other that that, it is much the same design, with rather unique post caps.

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Posts

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,931

    I am a bit discombobulated as all I can see is standard square trellis with what looks like standard post caps upside down. Am I missing something?

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • Hello hogweed. I have not seen the square trellis displayed in the dark posts and rails with white trellis in this design in the open sections,  have you?  

    The inverted post caps, which are of a design I also havent seen elsewhere, but perhaps not too clear on the photograph, so I will add a closeup from when I was making some new ones. The posts are planed 4 x 3" and smaller part of the post cap roughly a 1/4" larger to overhang. I have also not seen these before we moved her, or since, but perhaps you have?  Just thought that it may be of interest to others and give them ideas?

    image

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,187

    I think most gardeners see trellis as a support for planting, rather than a feature in it's own right Sam.

    It can certainly be a good feature over winter, when climbers have died back, if painted in a contrasting or toning colour to other timber nearby though, but the white is quite 'in your face'. Far too much for me I'm afraid image

    Post caps are the shape they are so that they shed water away from the post tops. Do you not get water running back into the tops if you have them that way round?  

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • After being up 30 years, most of the post tops were in good condition when the old caps were removed. They were heavily nailed down but I now have a centre screw in each new one, which is enough to hold it down and makes removal so much easier if needed.

    The trellis is usually covered with clematis and although the post positions have been moved a foot or so from original, I still have the clematis stems that reach the new posts. The lower hedges also shelter the roots and help to break up the visual effect. When we first saw this 20 years ago, we were well

    impressed.image

  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,404

    I'm not surprised that you were impressed. It does look lovely with the clematis on it image.

    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,019

    too much hardware for me but everyone to their own

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,931

    Sorry SS I did not realise you were referring to the paint job rather than the trellis pattern!

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • SeniorSamSeniorSam Posts: 25
    OK, now ready to add some Clematis for this year. Starting from scratch, what would be the best flowering clematis to select to give a good show throughout from April to October/November.   I prefer not to have to prune, rather than tidy up and would only disentangle the plants when it's time to re-paint every other year. 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,047
    I don't know of any clematis that flwoers that long.  Ones in flower in April tend to be over by May/June so I suggest you go for one like Alionushka which will flower from June to September and maybe a bit later in a good summer.  http://www.clematis.hull.ac.uk/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=1

    It is a group 3 so needs cutting back hard every spring and, as with any clematis, a good feed to encourage all the new stems.   Group 3s tend to be the easiest in terms of pruning care.  However, what you eventually choose will depend on how big you want it to grow and what colour as well as what flower form.   You can do more searches on the site I have indicated.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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