Forum home Wildlife gardening

Changing a pond

Hello,

looking for some advice as we are changing our wildlife pond from a preformed pond to a liner as we would like it to be much bigger and have a slope to it.

when is the best time to do this and how?

Now I've started to dig over part of the soil and will start removing it but the old pond is still in place so this also will need removing so that we can dig the new pond. We will reduce the water and try and lift the pond out to start the new one but how long can we leave the other pond as it won't be at ground level. Will it need to be all completed in a short period of time? We haven't measured the space yet for the liner but was thinking of doing this once the old one is out and the new one dug.

Hope this all makes sense. 

Love Yviestevie's pond! 

«13

Posts

  • image 

    The space so far.

  • image

    It looks untidy now as we have started to remove stones and plants.

  • My husband and I have now lifted the pond and had to take a lot of water out but have saved a lot of it, boy it was heavy and difficult to move! 

    We are beginning to shape the pond and can't wait to order the lining and will go to the local carpet shop for the underlay part of the pond.

    There is a lot of silt in the bottom of the old pond, is there likely to be creatures in there? 

    Last edited: 27 September 2017 07:39:04

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135

    Hi Stagbeetle - well done on all the effort so far image

    Yes, there probably will be, so if you can keep it in there till you have the new pond sorted, that would be ideal. It's then a case of sifting through it and putting back in the new pond. 

    Looking forward to seeing the end result. Keep us all up  to date image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thank you Fairygirl image

    I will have a look through the silt, we have tiny shrimps, didn't realise that you can get tiny shrimps in ponds.

    My neighbour has Lily's in her pond and wants to give us a couple as she has so many, will this be ok? 

  • Make sure you dig some of the pond to at least two feet deep if you are going to add the water lillies. Not many will do well in shallower water than that i don't think.
    From your pictures it looks like there will be enough sun for them.

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135

    There are lots of different sizes of water lilies, so just be aware of what will suit the size of your pond. As Paul says, you'll need the right sort of depth for them too.  They need to be submerged so that the foliage  just sits on the surface. If they're young, small plants, you can put them on a brick or something similar to raise them to the right level initially, and then drop them down as the stems lengthen  image

    The 'shrimps' will be the larvae of some insect or other. They're possibly dragonfly larvae/nymphs which live at the bottom for years before they turn into adult dragonflies. If you take a look online at photos, you'll be able to see if they look like yours. Or, take a photo and upload it here, and someone will be able to help ID them. image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Stagbeetle says:

    Thank you Fairygirl image

    I will have a look through the silt, we have tiny shrimps, didn't realise that you can get tiny shrimps in ponds.

    My neighbour has Lily's in her pond and wants to give us a couple as she has so many, will this be ok? 

    See original post

    If they're large and vigorous looking, I'd turn down the offer unless you particularly want waterlilies. They have a tendency to take over once they get going, and they don't provide particularly good habitat for pond wildlife. OK in a lake, not ideal in a small pond.

    Shrimps could be Crangonyx (pond shrimp), an American species. Alternatively, could be mayfly larvae, damselfly larvae or water hoglice (Asellus).

  • Don't use carpet underlay, get the proper pond underlay as that repels roots and doesn't rot.

  • Steve the Gardening Vet says:

    Don't use carpet underlay, get the proper pond underlay as that repels roots and doesn't rot.

    See original post

     fab thank you for your advice, I'll look at the underlay.

Sign In or Register to comment.