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Garden Kneelers

Hi,

I am a student, currently thinking of designing a product that will help gardening for the elderly. I found that garden kneelers were quite popular. Does anyone use a garden kneeler currently? Do you think any improvements could be made? Is it easy to get up/ sit down using them? If you were to get one, what would it need to be, Eg. would you want it to be collapsible for easy storage? would you want a seat attached? would you want any storage compartments and what for?

Thank you for the help,

Dylan

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Posts

  • Do you ever get tired whilst using the kneeler? As I understand that it can be strenuous to support yourself in an upright position. Would you appreciate a seat attached to the kneeler in this way: https://cdn3.volusion.com/yyenr.fzqwz/v/vspfiles/photos/BG-GB2290-2.jpg so that you could rest without standing up and flipping the kneeler so that it becomes a seat (with modifications to include handles to assist getting up/sitting down) over the traditional design looking like this: http://www.coopersofstortford.co.uk/images/products/large/ST06067i.jpg ?

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532

    Strap-on knee-pads for me, I like that they move when I do.  But I'm only 65 (which probably makes me elderly in your student mind) and not disabled, just not as nimble or flexible as I was.  It occurs to me that storing stuff in a kneeler would make it heavier to move around, wouldn't that defeat the object?  Perhaps a series of slots on the frame that would hold trowel, secateurs etc, and keep them within reach?  Or an attachment to hold a beer bottle and glass.  I'll stop now before I get any sillier.

  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,414
    Dylan1234 says:

    Do you ever get tired whilst using the kneeler? As I understand that it can be strenuous to support yourself in an upright position. Would you appreciate a seat attached to the kneeler in this way: https://cdn3.volusion.com/yyenr.fzqwz/v/vspfiles/photos/BG-GB2290-2.jpg so that you could rest without standing up and flipping the kneeler so that it becomes a seat (with modifications to include handles to assist getting up/sitting down) over the traditional design looking like this: http://www.coopersofstortford.co.uk/images/products/large/ST06067i.jpg ?

    See original post

     The first kneeler you link to is pretty bulky and I suspect fairly difficult to shift around.  I do like the design though as you can remain supported whilst leaning forward.  One of the problems I find with the normal reversible seat/kneeler is that it's too high for low level weeding if using the seat.  Leaning forward often results in the seat tipping and depositing me on the ground beside it.

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532

    How about a variation on those dalek-shaped step stools with wheels that retract when you put your weight on them?  Add grip rails to help with getting up and down.

  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,414

    The 'elephant foot' step is what I guess you're referring to.  Something like that actually may do the job, although it would still require some quite deep bending.  The one in the link does position the user lower to the ground.  The benefit of the 'elephant step' is that you aren't actually kneeling at all.  Horses for courses I guess.

  • I think I must spend more time on my knees than the most devout nun.image

    I use a carpet square with waterproof backing. Big enough to protect lower legs when kneeling, or to sit on if I want to. Best one was a shag pile, really comfy, but I wore it outimage!

    I stick my fork in the ground next to me if I need help rising from an awkward spot.

    I inherited one of those seat kneelers, but never use it - too narrow for comfort, have to keep feet bent for balance and if you use it as a seat in between, the handles get muddy!

  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,414

    I've had surgery on both knees and the only kneeler I find any good at present is a basic pad which cost under a fiver.  I use the reversible kneeler/seat to help me get back up, but find it too poorly padded to protect my knees.  In fact it probably puts more pressure on them than using the kneeling pad.

  • With regards to the 'elephants foot stool-kneeler idea,' I would be worried that the kneeler would move as the person was lowering themselves onto the device, before they had fully put their weight on it, possibly causing some injuries. Also, it may be hard to manoeuvre on uneven terrain, the small wheels getting stuck. (They would have to be small to fit under the body of the unit)

                For those of you with knee injuries/problems, I believe that having a tilted seat (as on the picture: https://cdn3.volusion.com/yyenr.fzqwz/v/vspfiles/photos/BG-GB2290-2.jpg ) would reduce the pressure on your knees. Other than that, extra padding and a larger area for your knees to rest would be useful. Having a larger, potentially 3-legged base would also help with the stability issue.

                Would you want some sort of storage built in for small tools or would this not be useful? Also, how much storage space do you think you would be able to spare in your house for a product like this?

  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,414

    The seat certainly would help in taking some of the weight off the knees.  It also makes it easier to shift weight around when getting up or leaning to the side. I wouldn't want any storage built in.  It would make it too bulky, and potentially too heavy.  I would be storing in a shed so as long as the knee pads fold up, and the pads and hand hold section fold back over the seat it would be idea for storing too.

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,449

    Like josusa47, strap-on knee-pads for me. I found the ones available at GC useless, I get them from the DIY dept for use by tile workers.

    see e.g. at http://www.protilertools.co.uk/knee-pads-for-tiling/43816/bahco-4750-kp-1-knee-pads

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
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