String or 'soft ties'

Just a general query from someone who's wife has decided she wants a lot of climbing roses in the garden. Is it best to use string or soft ties (which i noticed at a wyevale garden centre) to secure them to a trellis?

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 15,342

    IN MY EXPERIENCE, SOFT TIES ARE A BIT OF A MISNOMER AS THEY CONCEAL HARD WIRE.

    I HAVE TIED THINGS TO OTHER THINGS WITH "SOFT" TIES IN THE PAST, FORGOTTEN ABOUT THEM FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND COME BACK TO FIND THE POOR PLANT'S STEMS LITERALLY CUT IN TWO BY THE WIRE.

    I NOW USE GREEN TWINE, NOT THE PLASTIC GREEN TWINE, THE HEMP ONE.

    IT DISINTEGRATES AFTER A COUPLE OF SEASONS, ALLOWING THE PLANT TO GROW AND ALSO GIVES YOU THE CHANCE TO RETIE IT IF IT HASN'T ALREADY ATTACHED ITSELF BY MEANS OF THORNS, BRANCHES, LEAVES OR TENDRILS.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,120

    Ordinary garden string/twine will rot and snap over time, I use it for annuals mostly.  Long term, covered garden wire or even a cut up old pair of tights is best for permanent plant support. 

    I guess the soft ties are a type of coated wire ???  Never used them.

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,120

    I do it loose Pansy.... leaving some growing room image.

    My method is to twist it tight to the trellis, then do a loose loop around the stem. Check and adjust it now and then. 

  • I use the velcro tie which is on a roll from poundland (there's two rolls in a pack) for all my climbing plants, I just make sure I have it with the green/soft side facing the plant and the rough velcro edge facing outwards.

  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,364

    Soft jute twine only.  

    Most of my tying in is done with the green bio-degradeable jute garden twine. (I tend to find small balls of it I have taken out of pockets  around the house and  I now have an annual Christmas order for the stuff from my daughter.)

    I don't like the idea of the wire cutting into the plant. The advantage of the jute  is that the colour fades quite quickly. I find the jute more or less softens itself to suit what you are tying up.

    My dad used to use that polyproplene twine which I would not touch with a barge pole.




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

  • LantanaLantana Posts: 5,796

    I always use the wire that's covered with a soft rubbery material, if that's what's meant by 'covered wire'. I've never had any problems with it cutting into anything but then, I don't tie it tightly. 

    Last edited: 25 August 2017 22:35:24

  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,364

    But soft rubbery wire does not bio degrade. I get at least good two seasons with jute twine. 




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,364

    I am still tying in my C montanas regularly to cover and disguise a long run of ugly tree stumps behind my garden. Once it is out of my reach my garden twine bill will be a lot less.  image   The Rambling Rector gets it as well but he is a rather bigger challenge.




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

  • Thank you everyone for your replies, it looks like i will stick with the garden jute/twine/string for the time being then :)

  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 2,041

    Mostly I use string but on permanent planting  say the stem of a standard rose other other woody stems I use "soft tie"  tie in a figure of 8 this gives the plant stem  space to expand if I neglect to check often enough. 

    AB Still learning

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