Peas and Mildew

Hi all, 

First time here, and first time with my own garden growing fruit and veg this year. 

I have some peas in a large planter that have developed powdery mildew. Looks like it's pretty much spread over the entire crop in this planter. 

I've had a reasonable crop from these peas, and I have other pea plants (from the same packet of seeds) planted elsewhere in the garden. 

Should I invest in some fungicide and try and save the peas - or do I give them up for a lost cause now? 

Thanks in advance for your advice! 

Ben

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 48,963

    If you've had a good crop I'd get rid of them now ... bag and bin ... and keep your other pea plants well watered ... being too dry at the roots can cause plants to be susceptible to powdery mildew. 

    Good luck image

    "...tea and toasted buttered currant buns, can't compensate for lack of sun because the summer's all gone..."   Autumn Almanac - Ray Davies
  • Dovefromabove says:

    If you've had a good crop I'd get rid of them now ... bag and bin ... and keep your other pea plants well watered ... being too dry at the roots can cause plants to be susceptible to powdery mildew. 

    Good luck image

    See original post

     

    Thanks Dove. 

    I've read about mildew being a result of plants being too dry - But I'm in North West England and we have had a TONNE of rain, especially in the last few weeks. And on those dry days I have made sure to water with fertiliser/feed too. Could it actually be the opposite, being too wet? 

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 48,963

    Well, the theory is that plants that are stressed succumb to powdery mildew, and the most common cause of stress in summer is drought.  

    My usual rule of thumb is to stick my finger into the compost up to the first finger joint  If it's dry at the tip then I water, making sure that I give enough water to soak the whole container full of compost. 

    Even when we have heavy rain, surprisingly little of it actually gets into containers as it's shielded by the plant and most of it runs off.  

    "...tea and toasted buttered currant buns, can't compensate for lack of sun because the summer's all gone..."   Autumn Almanac - Ray Davies
  • Thanks Dove! Good point. 

    Maybe I should make sure to be more thorough with my watering - I suppose I was wary about overwatering. 

  • Womble54Womble54 WimbledonPosts: 154

    I had the same problem. My pea plants were covered in mildew. I pulled them all up then planted a new batch of peas in the same spot a couple of weeks later.

    So far so good, the new pea plants have started to flower and produce peas. No signs of mildew yet. I'm trying to keep them well watered and keeping my fingers crossed.

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