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Fruit trees in my village - what are they?

Hi all

There are a couple of fruit trees in my village which I need help ID'ing... I wondered if anyone can help please? I have taken a little fruit from both of them, so if dissecting and adding photos of that would help, please let me know and I'll do so.

Here's photos of the first one:

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Posts

  • And some photos of the second one:

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,465

    Those look like various varieties of ornamental crab apples to me image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 33,876

    I agree with Dove. Top one looks like Crab Apple John Downie and the bottom one like Crab Apple Golden Hornet.

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Many thanks for the quick replies. 

    My partner and I both thought crab apples as well (at least for the first one. I only noticed the second tree today when I went to see the first!). She found a recipe for hedgerow ketchup/chutney which said crab apples could be used, and so we went to look at the tree armed with what little knowledge we'd gleamed from a google search. 

    But whilst there, a chap from one of the neighbouring houses came out and I asked him (about the first tree only). He said he was pretty sure that they are NOT crab apples. He thought maybe quinces; although he wasn't certain on that. He also said he once had a chat with the people who used to live in the house that the trees are outside of, and that they likewise didn't think they were crab apples. 

    And that's when I thought I'd turn to you guys...

    So is there anything I can do or check to see once and for all if they are crab apples or not? 

    Oh, and one other thing, are they not ripe enough at the moment to use in anything? 

    Thanks again

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,465

    Don't look like quinces to me ... quinces are large, usually at least as big as most eating apples if not bigger, and most are coated with a furry downy coat.  The tree leaves don't look right for quinces either.

    I'd put my money on crab apples and they may well be John Downie and Golden Hornet.  

    And I'd let them get a bit riper ... cut them in half ... when the pips are brown the apples are ripe. image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • OK, thanks :) 

    RE the brown pips = ripe advice, is that true of ALL apples?  I've been wondering if the apples on the trees in my garden are ripe yet.  I ate a discovery yesterday and from what I remember the pips were more a creamy white colour.  Wasn't sure if that is just the case with certain varieties though.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,465

    In my experience it hold true for all apples image  But of course, if you like a sharp apple you can eat it a bit under ripe.

    I bought some local Discovery from the farm shop yesterday and the pips are very pale but the apples are perfectly edible - very enjoyable ... we're eating some and I've made an apple cake  ... but Discovery are probably the first English apple to be picked and the farmers like to get them to the shops nice and early.  

    Of course the best way to see if your apples are ripe is to lift and turn ... if the stem snaps then it should be ripe ... then taste and see image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,834

    If you wait for the pips in Discovery to go brown then the apples will be past their best. Ditto Katy.

  • CFCCFC Posts: 71

    Those are both crab apples.

  • I think crab apples as well certainly not quince they are very different.

    I would not be looking to use them until September.

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