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Laurel hedge planting distance to fence

Daz4225Daz4225 Posts: 3

Hi, I hope somebody can help me out by answering a couple of questions I have about laurel. I have just had a new 6 foot concrete post / wood panel fence put in around my back garden. I want to plant a hedge against it on my garden side to provide privatcy from neighbours but worried the fence may get damaged. Does anybody know what distance from the fence I should plant the laurel to allow it to grow without damaging the fence. Also there's a part of my garden that is concrete, so would like to plant some laurel in a raised planter made out of sleepers, would this be sufficient space for laurel to grow into a hedge? Thanks in advance for any advise.

Last edited: 15 August 2017 21:04:31

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  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,999

    Hello Daz4225

    I would allow at least 3' between the laurels and the fence ; this facilitates (with pruning) access to the panels for treating etc. at a later date .

    Laurels in a raised bed might soon become starved of minerals (chlorotic) as they are vigorous growers , and generate a considerable root system .

  • Daz4225Daz4225 Posts: 3

    Thanks very much for your reply. Has really helped me out 

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,999

    image Glad to have helped !

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 21,137

    If you haven't bought the plants yet, don't make the mistake of thinking that 2mt plants will give you a good hedge, you're better off buying 2 to 3' plants and cut of a good six inches when planting. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Daz4225Daz4225 Posts: 3

    I was going to but plants that are between 5 and 6 '
    Would you advise against this?

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 21,137

    I definitely would advise against that, they will grow on quicker if you buy smaller ones and pinch out the tops.

    a lot of people make the mistake of thinking buying big will give an instant hedge, it won't, because they will be tall and thin, you need to aim for short and bushy, then let them grow up, they will soon reach 6' if you plant them right. 

    Someone on here did the very same thing, he wasn't happy with them as they looked sparse, we recommend that he cut them down by half, he did, and has a beautiful hedge now, and that was only about two or three years ago.

    if you wait until winter you can get bare root ones, about 3tall,  they are much cheaper and will grow on well, making roots through the winter then shoot up in the Spring. 

    Pick out the tops whenever you walk past them, all helps to thicken from the bottom. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Paul B3Paul B3 Posts: 2,999

    Lyn is spot on here ; smaller plants usually establish more readily , and often produce a far better hedge than larger specimens .

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