Fruit Preserving Books

Victoria SpongeVictoria Sponge WearsidePosts: 2,783

Morning all,

I started preserving fruit last year, pears I had a glut of, and this year I have a lot of Pink Glow crab apples I'd like to do something with.

Can anyone recommend a book (physical book format preferredimage) on how to preserve various UK fruit? I know I can freeze most things but preserving, making jams and wines etc would be more fun. 

Any ideas appreciatedimage

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,429

    My two 'go to' preserving books are 

    'Home Preservation of Fruit and Vegetables' ... an old book published by HMSO for the former Ministry of Agriculture but available here https://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/title/home-preservation-of-fruit-and-vegetables/ 

    and the River Cottage 'Preserves' handbook.  

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 2,656

    My 'bible' is another oldie : 'The Complete Book of Food Preservation', by Cyril Grange, F. R. H .S., third edition, published 1949 image I inherited it from my mum, who must have had from the early days of her married life. It covers meat, fish, poultry and eggs as well as fruit and veg, but freezers make that section less relevant today. The jam and marmalade chapters are invaluable though and bear the marks of frequent useimage I haven't found the need for another book on the basics, though it doesn't cover the range of multi-cultural tastes you would probably want today, not even mango chutney, though it does tell you how to salt runner beans and make sauerkraut!

    It is available online from several sellers, including a new, republished version.

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,766

    River Cottage preserves book for me. It's pages are getting a bit sticky here and there image

    You've got to know when to hold 'em, know when to fold 'em
    Know when to walk away and know when to run
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,333

    Home-made preserves by Jill Nice (Fontana paperbacks).   organised alphabetically by fruit and very good.  She's the one who put me on to spiced blackcurrant jelly which is a revelation.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Victoria SpongeVictoria Sponge WearsidePosts: 2,783

    Smashing guys, thank youimage

    I will do some research and report back. I thought I'd get some advice as I don't want to end up with a book of wrong-climate fruit - I'll only be preserving things I can grow myself.

    Sorted alphabetically sounds like a good idea too.

    Many thanksimage

  • Victoria SpongeVictoria Sponge WearsidePosts: 2,783

    Bought these books in the end:

    image

    Got them second hand, think the postage was more than the booksimage They seem to contain slightly different versions of the same recipes apart from the blue one which doesn't seem to have sloe ginimage An extraordinary omission.

    I need to order some tranklements, jelly bag, jam thermometer, wooden spoon, a pan etc, then just have to watch for the harvest. Unsure whether to pick and freeze the sloes or leave til the frost. A few crabs have come off the tree but maybe just the wind or birds crashing about as they're still hard despite the rosy-red ripeness look about them.

    Thanks for your help guys and good luck with any jamming you might be doingimage 

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,333

    I have a jelly bag and used it twice.  It now lives in its box with its contraption.  Found it to be too small and very fiddly to set up.

    Much easier to buy muslin cloths and drape them over a colander or steamer set over a large bowl or pan and then just leave overnight, covered against flies.   

    Have fun.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Victoria SpongeVictoria Sponge WearsidePosts: 2,783

    Ah, good idea. I'll do that Obelixx, thanks. I haven't got a colander but it will probably come in useful.

    I did think the jelly bag contraption looked a tad rickety but thought that was perhaps how it was done.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,333

    We have several colanders so OH can have one for the different fruits as he goes round the garden.   The plastic kind don't rust or stain if he forgets them outside.........

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Victoria SpongeVictoria Sponge WearsidePosts: 2,783

    Righto, good advice, thank you. Actually they will come in handy since I have an allotment, best way to get the soft fruit home, I reckonimage

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