Rotting peppers!

For 2 years running my greenhouse grown red peppers (in large pots) develop these marks on them - usually beginning at the base - which then begin to spread. Can anyone tell me why and what I might be doing wrong?

image

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,593

    Peppers can get Blossom End Rot, for the same reasons as tomatoes ... could that be the problem?

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Muddle-UpMuddle-Up Posts: 14,511

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Advice/Profile?pid=395

    Not sure, Lantana....could be blossom end rot, though it looks a bit pale.....what a shame, because that's a grand looking pepper......

    Aberdeenshire, NE Scotland 🌞  
    FIDDLESTICKS AND FLAPDOODLE!
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,593

    Looks like the BER here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdfnhXJU9fM 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • LantanaLantana Posts: 5,791

    Thanks for the advice. The strange thing is none of my tomatoes have ever been affected and they are situated right opposite and they all receive similar watering and feeding. First things first, I'll nip out and remove any others that have become affected by this.

    MU, had an even bigger, better one than that, and it got patches too!image I'd been looking forward to that pepper!

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,593

    Isn't any of it useable? 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • LantanaLantana Posts: 5,791

    Being fussy, I prefer red peppers and if I wait for them to turn red the problem will have spread virtually right throughimage 

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,593

    I use  a mix of chopped green peppers, celery and onion known as The Trinity in Creole and Cajun cooking, as a base for several dishes including Chilli con carne  .... Scroll down to see it here 

    http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/05/all-about-mirepoix.html 

    You could make a batch, soften in oil and keep in the freezer in useful portions.  

    Or you can chuck it of course, if you can't be faffed or don't like that sort of dish image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,612

    Green peppers also make a nice flavoured gravy for use in winter.  Sliced and frozen, they will last for several months.

  • LantanaLantana Posts: 5,791

    They're not bad at all when cooked in a base. It's eating them raw in salads I'm not too keen on. Wish me better luck next yearimage

  • LMHmedchemLMHmedchem Posts: 14

    I would try a foliar calcium spray once a week and Epsom salts solution once every other week. Remove any peppers that look like the ones you posted about.

    For the Epsom salts, dissolve 1tbs of Epsom salts in 1 gallon of lukewarm water and add 1 cup to the base of each plant every other week.

    For the calcium, I use this,

    Rot-Stop

    http://www.bonide.com/products/plant-care/view/166/rot-stop-tomato-blossom-end-rot

    Mix this at 4tbl/gallon and spray the leaves until they start to drip. Do this every week until the problem goes away and then every other week. If this fixes the issue, you may want to consider adding some bone meal to your soil next year before you plant.

    I would do the Epsom salts on your tomatoes as well as they generally need some magnesium.

    LMHmedchem

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