Ok, expert lawn people, please advise

Hi,

this is my first post, be gentle!

I am moving into a new house on Aug 21st; the lawn there is pretty ropey to say the least.

I would like to have a nice lawn and garden.

Please could you advise on how you would go about rescuing/developing a good lawn.

There is a large tree on the middle so I guess it would be classed as shady. The tree is protected and cannot be choppef down.

Anyway, I would appreciate a step-by-step guide if possible (without trying to sound too demanding!) what I need to buy/acquire and what I need to do.

Many, many thanks for any help.

Andy 

Last edited: 28 July 2017 20:49:06

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Posts

  • andrew346andrew346 Posts: 7

    image

    Here is a pic of the lawn! Best I have - current occupier sent it to me.

  • andrew346andrew346 Posts: 7
    Doghouse Riley says:

    The tree dominates  the garden, is there is any reason why it should get some drastic pruning to a reasonable shape and size, at the appropriate time?

    I'd think you'll have a never ending job attaining a reasonable lawn whilst it's the size it is, whatever you do.

    See original post

    Hi, the property is on a large school site, and the trees are protected apparently. We asked previously about the tree and was informed that it cannot be chopped down but they will look into pruning.

    Thank you for the reply.

  • Rob LockwoodRob Lockwood Posts: 167

    A nice lawn and garden doesn't have to mean a big lawn Andrew and the more I try to sort my lawn the more I think lawns are harder work than flower borders! Grass generally grows best in sun, so aiming for a lawn in areas which get sun most of the day will be easier than insisting on it under trees / next to fences etc. Have a look at which areas of the garden get the sun at various times of day and consider a flower bed near the tree perhaps? Also have a think what's causing the browner patches - might be the tree but might be something else such as too much traffic / damp patches etc

    As regards the work to get the lawn, pull up any obvious weeds and scarify/rake out the yellowy/brown stuff, and then assess whether to seed or turf depending on how much grass remains. If you do this work now (usual advice is to do it as the rains start in autumn), keep it watered to give the remaining grass a chance to grow strong. It'll need aeration and I'd probably look at.hollow-tining the more compacted bits (washing lines /kids' goalposts, paths to sheds etc). Then feeding... Yep, just reminded myself why it can be loads of work! Worth it though, as long as it's got a chance of thriving (sunny spot!). This site's great (no connection): http://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/topics

    Last edited: 29 July 2017 12:46:07

  • andrew346andrew346 Posts: 7
    Rob Lockwood says:

    A nice lawn and garden doesn't have to mean a big lawn Andrew and the more I try to sort my lawn the more I think lawns are harder work than flower borders! Grass generally grows best in sun, so aiming for a lawn in areas which get sun most of the day will be easier than insisting on it under trees / next to fences etc. Have a look at which areas of the garden get the sun at various times of day and consider a flower bed near the tree perhaps? Also have a think what's causing the browner patches - might be the tree but might be something else such as too much traffic / damp patches etc

    As regards the work to get the lawn, pull up any obvious weeds and scarify/rake out the yellowy/brown stuff, and then assess whether to seed or turf depending on how much grass remains. If you do this work now (usual advice is to do it as the rains start in autumn), keep it watered to give the remaining grass a chance to grow strong. It'll need aeration and I'd probably look at.hollow-tining the more compacted bits (washing lines /kids' goalposts, paths to sheds etc). Then feeding... Yep, just reminded myself why it can be loads of work! Worth it though, as long as it's got a chance of thriving (sunny spot!). This site's great (no connection): http://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/topics

    Last edited: 29 July 2017 12:46:07

    See original post

    Thanks, Rob, for the detailed post. I am just looking at websites on the topic. I will check out the link of for sure.

    I can't get to work yet as I am not moving in until Aug 21st. Oh, I have a scarifier and an aerator at the ready..

    Last edited: 29 July 2017 12:51:57

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,654

    image

    Intentional damage to a tree with a TPO can result in a fine of up to £20,000 and a criminal record. LA Tree Officers aren't stupid. 

    Far better to seek advice from a properly qualified arboriculturist about judicious pruning, crown lifting and thinning in order to enhance and prolong the life of the tree, and present this evidence to the Tree Officer. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,004

    Double imageimage

    Pruned correctly, most rees are manageable, and one with a TPO certainly  can't be messed around with. Seeking the right advice is the way to go.

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Dave HumbyDave Humby Posts: 907

    Hi Andrew and welcome to the forum. I live in an area that is fairly extensively covered by TPO's including 2 beech trees and a silver birch on our property. We have had work done on ours but there is a process to go through which, in my case, was made much easier by enlisting the help of a local tree surgeon early on who knew the 'workings' of the local authority and what would  / might / wouldn't be accepted as part of an application for work. The tree surgeon actually got the council chap to come out to my property and they agreed the work in principle so when we did put our application in it was pretty straightforward.

    I have to say that, from what I can see of the tree in the photo, I'm a little surprised that it has a TPO on it. You may want to look into that further. You will get any necessary documents relating to this as part of the house sale or your conveyancing solicitor will already be aware of any such orders.

    Anyway, back to your lawn. Rob L has provided some great info. I would maybe consider not trying to grow grass under the canopy of the tree as this is destined for disappointment but maybe you could create a planting area for shade tolerant shrubs. Good luck. 

    Last edited: 02 August 2017 09:43:36

  • Hi, thanks for the responses. Very much appreciate your time.

    I certainly won't be drilling or putting diesel in..

    Regarding the tree and the TPO.. the house is situation on the grounds of a prestigious private school and over 600 acres - all the trees on the site are protected apparently. So, it might not be the TPO that you commonly know (I don't have a clue to be honest). We are going to ask the Estates Manager once we move in later this month so see exactly what we can do.

    Thanks again.

  • THALASSATHALASSA Posts: 13

    We had the same problem with a huge protected apple tree which was very old and beautiful. After advice we got rid of the grass in a large circle round the trunk under the canopy and filled it with grasses and shade tolerant shrubs with 4 radius paths leading to the trunk for collecting apples and light pruning. This worked really well and looked great. The lawn also then looked fantastic surrounding the tree and the new bed.

  • Hello everyone,

    So, I popped in to the new house yesterday and I am moving in on Monday.

    Looks like the estate's team have seeded the lawn and by allowing it to germinate/grow, it is very long and full of weed. 

    Given the time of year, what would be the best to do to start the process of getting a decent/better looking lawn. 

    I am reading the articles on lawn smith.co.uk by the way.

    Assuming the lawn is at least lower than this by Monday, it is wise to get some aeration done, blanket application of weed killer (product recommended by lawn smith website) and then left until the Spring to start with clearing, scarification, seeding etc? Or could/should more be done before Autumn in your opinions?

    I would love to hear your opinions on how you would tackle this as from Monday..please.

    Thought I could upload a video but I can't so I will post a few photos. Hopefully you will be able to get an idea..

    Last edited: 18 August 2017 11:54:40

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