Evergreen clematis dying

I have 3 evergreen clematis (Early Sensation, Jingle Bells and Avalanche) planted last year and all flowered this year. However over the last few weeks I've noticed that they are all dying back from the ground up. They are all in a raised bed and get the morning sun. Help please as I love, love, love my clematis and will be devastated if I lose them.

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,310

    I'd suspect they're very dry. Clematis need a lot of water. 

    Have you got a photo you can post to see if it's anything else? Click on the camera icon in the top right hand corner and follow instructions. If it doesn't load, it may need to resized a bit smaller  image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • jar51jar51 Posts: 3

    Thanks Fairygirl. I'll try to provide a photo of each of them but not brilliant with technology.  The plants do look 'healthy' other than the brown dry leaves so as a precaution I'm watering each plant a full watering can (a gallon?) each evening in the hope that it may be the problem. A friend has suggested putting a disposable nappy underneath the roots of the plants as they are brilliant  at retaining water as the plants are in a raised bed!

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,310

    Forget the 'gimmicks' - just water them! If they're in raised beds, they'll tend to drain more quickly so you may also need to look at  what medium you have them planted in. They like good drainage, but they need good, rich soil too, so the addition of well rotted manure and a decent compost to the bed will help.

    Also, if they're planted too near a fence/wall , that can affect the moisture at the roots of the plants as they can be in a bit of a rain shadow. Is that where you have them?

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • jar51jar51 Posts: 3

    They are planted next to a fence but there is a 'wall' of pond lining holding the soil in. They are planted in  purchased top soil and never gave it a thought that they needed extra feed. When you say 'compost' does that include the bagged variety? Can you tell by my naivetythat I am fairly new to gardening???

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,310

    Yes - any decent bagged compost will do. It's also a good idea to use a general fertiliser in spring - something like Blood, Fish and Bone which is slow release, and will help to feed your plants throughout the year. You just lightly sprinkle that into the soil round the plants. You can also buy bags of rotted manure, and you can add that to the soil, especially in autumn/winter when plants are largely dormant, which will help to beef up the soil in the bed. Just lay it on top and it will gradually get worked into the soil. Do the same with any compost you buy. Unlike most other plants, Clematis should be planted deeper than they are in the pots they come in. This helps to encourage extra stems from lower down, but if you haven't done that - don't worry. Applying extra composrt/manure will benefit them anyway.

    You can also use a clematis feed, or a tomato feed, for them leading up to flowering, although as those are mainly Group1 types which flower in the earlier part of the year, just having good soil which isn't drying out, is the best form of nourishment. Avalanche is slightly different, and isn't evergreen as far as I'm aware, however it does flower early so the same treatment applies.

    I often give my early flowering ones (Group 1 and 2) an extra feed (tomato food) after flowering, as they can give a second show of flowers later in the year. Keeping clematis moist (not waterlogged) at the roots is important for good growth. image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BerkleyBerkley Posts: 380

    I have the same clematis - and was relieved to read the other day that the evergreen ones go through a sort of dormancy in the Summer and often look quite poorly. I make sure mine are kept well-watered (and fed in the period before blooming). They have survived several Summers of looking decidedly unwell - so don't panic!

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