Very Long Fence Line

Hi

The land next to us has been sold for housing. The builder has installed a very high, close board fence. It runs the whole length or our property from front to back. I would like to screen the fence with low maintenance shrubs. I do not want a hedge that has to be cut. Any plants, due to the size of the garden, need to be low maintenance.

The fence is South facing and the soil is good.

I like grasses and clump forming bamboo. I would prefer wildlife friendly plants. We do have a dog. There is a pond in the (very large) garden which is home to a breeding pair of moorhens.

I am a beginner gardener.

Posts

  • Beaus MumBeaus Mum Posts: 3,532

    Hi Pat 

    if I was you I would think of the fence as a lovely back drop to your plants rather than try and cover it.

    i have read your other post and yes it will be exspensive if you plan to buy plants and do all in one go.

    maybe take your time and work out exactly what you want and then think about splitting plants, growing from seed, begging from friends etc ?

    I look forward to seeing pics of how you get on 

  • Good thinking Beaus Mum. I will try to bear that thinking in mind. I was horrified when the fence started to go up as we used to overlook fields on that side. I must look on it as a back drop now.

    I did think about putting sculpture type objects on or in front of it too. Being a village in a rural area I could use things like troughs or wagon wheels etc if I could find them cheap enough.

  • Beaus MumBeaus Mum Posts: 3,532

    I know it must be horrid as the fields will be soon gone but if you let that get to you, you will go nuts image

    recently I went to an open garden and all around the edge of their garden was a very busy main road but when you were in the garden you would have never known.

    they had created rooms, seating areas and each was different and totally secluded from the road.

    maybe think about planting up in arcs rather than all along in a straight line?

    sculpture display areas is lovely idea.  Maybe try local car boots etc for the troughs etc image

  • By "Arcs" do you mean like a wavy line down the fence? I had thought of this but am a bit worried that I will need even more plants!

  • Beaus MumBeaus Mum Posts: 3,532

    Sorry bit hard to describe but I mean create flower beds that will take your eye away from the long fence 

    here are some gardens I googled to try and show you what I mean image

    imageimageimage

  • Ah! Yes they do look lovely :)

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,761

    A wildlife friendly and relatively inexpensive option would be to plant native hedgerow shrubs and plants.
    If you keep the spacing to about 18" they won't have any chance of growing to their full potential. Much like a hedge you see on a country road, but you could choose you own mix - let some wonderfully scented native honeysuckle and clematis twine around and it'd be an low maintenance, ever changing backdrop
    But maybe a bit too informal for your plans.

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,615

    Any hedge planting will need to be cut occasionally.  They are living plants and grow.

  • We already know it is going to be bungalows. The builder has increased the height of the fence because the bedrooms of the bungalows will face into our property and he is trying to gain them privacy. While I would quite like trees, and this would be our Northern boundary so we should not be troubled by too much shade, it would shade the new properties from getting the Southern light. Just seems a shame when we have a choice.

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,411
    patprice239 says:

    We already know it is going to be bungalows. The builder has increased the height of the fence because the bedrooms of the bungalows will face into our property and he is trying to gain them privacy. While I would quite like trees, and this would be our Northern boundary so we should not be troubled by too much shade, it would shade the new properties from getting the Southern light. Just seems a shame when we have a choice.

    See original post

     Small deciduous trees shouldn't be an issue.  In winter they will cast little shade, especially if you keep them thoughtfully pruned, and in summer your new neighbours might be glad of a little shade.  In your place, I'm afraid my attitude would be just a LITTLE bit " We were here first, we didn't ask for the new development, and you chose to come". Unless you've got neighbours from hell, these sort of things can usually be settled over coffee.  How about fruit trees, and tell the neighbours they're welcome to pick whatever overhangs?

    Last edited: 23 July 2017 14:17:31

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