Leaf mould compost

For people who do not have the facilities to produce their own leaf mould compost, what is a commercially available alternative please?

Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 18,303

    I think there isn't one.

    Devon.
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 2,427

    Is there nowhere you could tuck a black bin bag full of leaves? under a shrub maybe?

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,329

    There are outlets for Leaf Mould although I have never used any of it so cannot comment, look on line.

    Leaf Mould if you have a supply of leaves is the easiest of composts to make. I live on tree lined lanes so have a plentiful supply of leaves. My way is to put the piles of leaves on the drive and run the mower over them to chop them up a bit. Then put them in black bags and wet them, tie the bag but cut holes in the bag in several places and I hide them behind my bushes. Turn the bag over every few weeks making sure the inside is damp not soaked and in one year you will have black gold. You can soon build up to a constant supply by adding bags to your stock. Leaves are Carbon rich as against Nitrogen rich compost, perfect for seed growing or adding to normal compost. If you have room for a compost heap or even three plus your leaf mould you need never buy the so called stuff that passes for bought compost these days.

    Frank

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 1,503

    I remember my dear departed dad scraping the woodland floor and filling bags but that was 50-odd years ago before we all got eco-friendly.  Though it sounds as though your garden is small so the amount you'd take probably wouldn't have much impact, especially if you took small amounts here and there.  But you'd need the landowner's permission or it would be theft.

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,329

    Josusa, no need to scrape the woodland areas though we do have them, I moved on to this area 30 odd years ago and when walking the dog saw the council workmen sweeping up and bagging the leaves on the lane so asked what they did with them, the go to the incinerator but you can take as many bags as you need and I did every year. 

    Frank.

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 1,503
    Palaisglide says:

    Josusa, no need to scrape the woodland areas though we do have them, I moved on to this area 30 odd years ago and when walking the dog saw the council workmen sweeping up and bagging the leaves on the lane so asked what they did with them, the go to the incinerator but you can take as many bags as you need and I did every year. 

    Frank.

    See original post

     Dear Frank, to clarify:. I meant my dad was taking the leafmould ready made from the woods, rather than bagging leaves and waiting for years to use it.  I live in a built up area but there are trees in the pavements and front gardens, so I collect leaves and make my own.  I also collect fir and pine cones from the park to use as a decorative mulch.

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,329

    Josusa, I got the drift of your post and it was done in my time by some, not good for the  woodlands. Brought up on smallholdings and farms we always had plenty of compost with horses as well as other animals plus all the green waste that went into the midden to rot down I learned the best ways to make compost. We had masses of trees along the Mill Lane where we lived and it was my job to bag the leaves  up, hession sacks back then and put them in the wire baskets we rotted them down in.

    Hot boxes were erected in February and topped with our leaf mould mixed with loam for early strawberries and seed planting plus Dads melons before they went in the greenhouses. Dad was a keen gardener, had to be in war time, "if you cannot eat it or sell it do not grow it" but he had his own favourites. Many of the plants I have are his old favourite Peony, Lily's, Carnations to name a few although Chrysanthemums were too much bother, Dad grew them to show and often won with his.

    I pop in to the board now and then when something gets my interest  not too often now though, the old school of gardening appears to have gone to instant everything and I am not instant anything. A good garden is hard work, short cuts mean doing things twice at least but doing it right the second time. I think my time has gone, even my Daughter has laid a plastic lawn for ease of maintenance, I change my will tomorrow.

    Frank.

    Last edited: 20 July 2017 14:42:30

Sign In or Register to comment.