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Ridiculously pleased with mahonia cuttings

Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453

I pruned the mahonia and took these cuttings on 2 June and I'm so chuffed that they have taken, but I'm not sure what to do now

They have sprouted much sooner than I expected and I think I should leave them in the pot a bit longer, but advice would be welcome please

I don't yet know where they will go in the garden but I also realise that decision is a way off yet 

NB the mahonia is now looking heater and has lovely blue berries so it is clearly happier for a trim, as is the postman! 

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Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,118

    They look grand Stephanie  image

    I'd leave them until thay have roots showing at the bottom of the pot and then carefully separate them and pot each one up into it's own little pot. Then just pot on each time they fill the pot they're in till you have a big enough plant to put out -  or a place to put them!

    There may be enough root on them just now, so just take a look. It's one of things that comes down to judgement, but Mahonias are pretty tough, so they'll probably be fine.

    I wonder if the postman will be as pleased when you have several more to negotiate.....image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453

    Thanks fairygirl, they smell lovely in the winter but they definitely prickle!

    Supplementary question, at the moment the pot sits on the bench in the shed as the info I read on cuttings said light but not direct sunlight. The shed is opened every day so gets air circulation, so is that still a good place to keep them? 

    Thanks

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,118

    I'd get them outside Stephanie. Just somewhere sheltered so that they're not in full sun, or exposed to any rough weather if you're in a colder,  wetter area. Just keep an eye  on them so that they don't get overly wet or dry.

    That way, they'll be sturdier plants ready for autumn and winter, and  they'll be in bigger pots anyway which will make it easier. image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453

    We're in Aberdeenshire so I guess they need to get used to the less clement weather. At the moment it is warm and muggy so I will put them somewhere where they will get a few drops of rain but not a deluge, and some shelter from the wind when it blows.  I have just the spot in mind..... image

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,118

    Good shout Stephanie. I'm a little further south and west of you (west central Scotland) so the rain is more of an issue than anything. Young plants can cope with dry cold better than wet cold too, so a nice little spot where they can gradually get accustomed to the big outdoors will stand them in good stead. Even hardy, tough  plants can succumb to lousy conditions when they're young,  so it's ideal  if you can give them a bit of help until they're bigger.image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,391

    Be aware that thick sections like that are capable of growing shoots out of the stored energy in the tissue but may not have rooted yet, especially in such a short time.  I had a rose cutting which looked similar and was developing new shoots and leaves but eventually died after about 3-4 months and when I checked it had grown no roots at all!  I'm sure they will root if they haven't already but I wouldn't risk repotting or planting out yet and would do as fairy says - a sheltered spot and regular tlc. image

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
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