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Need help - Nothing looks healthy

We moved into this home (Phoenix, AZ) a few years ago and I've tried a lot of things, talked to local nurseries etc. I've already lost one queen palm about a year ago and replaced it. Now the new one isn't looking so good. I have my single valve drip system set up for 60min a day and have Rain Bird variable 360 micro-bubblers (most set to around 2GPH). I just dug up a few and the first 3in of soil seems moist about 5 hours after being watered (I'll check again tonight).

I did some Miracle Grow all purpose continuous release plant food for the flowering plants in early march and some continuous release palm plant food on the palm during the same time. Also mixed in some new all purpose soil during that time. The palms have always looked like this no matter what I try however the flowering plants look extra sad this year. We have had some record heat and my yard gets about 10 hours of sun a day.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Even any help with identifying would be appreciated.

Queen Palm #1 (2 years old):

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Queen Palm #2:

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Queen Palm #3:

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Plant #1:

I've seen this one fully bloom once and it was beautiful. It tried to bloom in mid-spring but has been crispy since the heat wave came. I suspect this one may be over-watered?

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Plant #2:

Had a few blooms on this one mid-spring which would open in the morning and close at night. Since the heat came some of the leaves have yellowed and the blooms mostly shriveled up and fell.

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Plant #3:

This one has little pink flowers with white on the inside but has been really sad this year.

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Plant #4:

Normally has little orange flowers but hasn't bloomed.

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Plant #5:

Normally has little yellow flowers but hasn't bloomed.

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Posts

  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,008

    `Most of us on this forum are UK based so know very little about your conditions, but to me it  looks as if the problem is that.you are trying to grow non-desert plants in a  famous desert . Even with the extra water they are struggling because their leaves are not adapted to cope with the heat, sun  and dry air and so they lose too much water through transpiration.  The plants that grow wild in your part of the world are ones that are adapted to the environment with small leaves, or spines, like the cactuses, hairy or grey or silver to reduce sun damage etc. Right plant, right place!

    Your choice is either to make a beautiful desert garden, using plants from simlar environments around the world, or to somehow make your garden more suitable for the plants you have chosen.This will be difficult or maybe impossible. Some shade would help - maybe shade sails? -  but you would need more overall humidity and some plants need a cool period  or sufficient water at a critical time to produce flowering and the heat will always be an issue for some. Unable tio ID your plants as clipping gives no clues as to growth habit, so cannot be more precise.

    Last edited: 09 July 2017 09:04:07

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