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Staking a katsura

Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453

This is one of those problems we thought we had addressed but now need remedial action.

We had a katsura in a pot and planted it last year, with a stake for support. The home made soft ish tie allowed for some flex but the tree is growing off to one side and really needs supporting better to encourage it to grow more upright.

It looks like it is looking for light but although it has shade from behind, it faces south so gets the sun all day from left to right.

Should we replace the stake with a bigger one at the same side, just tied in nearer the top, or should we try to put a vertical support closer to the tree? 

I don't want to harm the roots but want to help it grow upright. Or should we just leave well alone?

One of the pics shows where it had previously been seeking light when in its pot in an unsuitable place.

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This pic shows the situation. The tree on the right is dead and we will cut it down in the autumn, but that would only shade the katsura at sunrise.

In case you're interested, the wall is made from sections of an old Anderson shelter!

Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,504

    That'll be a stunning tree in a few years. And what an interesting wall you have!
    My advice would be to leave well alone.
    Is the tree being blown in the direction it's growing by wind? Fields where I dog walk are very exposed to the south west and most of the trees appear to be growing toward the north east, it's just the relentless wind coming from that direction over time.
    Trees should be staked low on the trunk, ideally a bit lower than you have done, but should be ok. I'd strongly suggest getting a proper tree tie for it though.
    If the tree is in the position you want it, let it grow as it wants, then you can prune it to the sort of shape you want.

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453

    Thanks Pete, my husband chose the tree and I had never heard of it but there is an amazing one at Fyvie castle near Turrif, not far from here, and in the autumn it smells lovely, like toffee

    I thought about prevailing wind but we are in a hollow so that part of the garden is relatively sheltered, and I've just looked now and it is in full sun at the minute and will be until at least 3pm. Maybe it just wants to grow that way image

    I haven't looked at pruning yet but thought it unlikely to need any due to its general habit, but of course the leading stem is the leaning stem so it may end up with a wonky habit!

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