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  • Pat EPat E Posts: 11,688

    Here are some useful diagnostic pointers to some Eucs.

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    sorry don't know how to straighten this one.

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    Giving acknowledgement to my source.

    S. E. NSW
  • yarrow2yarrow2 Posts: 782

    PatE:  Thanks so much for taking the time to look up this diagnostic detail, scan it and post it.    I also began to trawl the net - but the detail on Snow Gum and others gave me a headache and a huge regret that I was never any good at the level of detail required to pin down species etc.

    I am going to call it the Snow Gum from now on; although on the internet it was confusing as some of the gum nursery information seemed to imply that it wouldn't grow as tall as the one here.  But then again, different conditions and all that might make a difference and as we are hemmed in on all sides by tall flats - we tend to get too tall or leggy ordinary plants as the sun is never direct, but comes over the height of the buildings from east to west each day.  This means that in our gardens here, the plants all 'lean' and stretch towards the direction where the sun is most bright which tends to be around 1pm for an hour or two, just because of the tall buildings. So the plants all lean towards the West in my garden.  Walking through this garden sometimes feels like being on a ship!!

    I took a photo of the end of a young branch brought down this morning by fighting pigeons.  I think these are 'juvenile' leaves and seem to fit leaf b. on your page regarding the veining.  I've also found more photo of the stages of what I called pods but which from your info. pages are the 'operculum' - I've concluded that the stages of my 'operculum' are as in the very bottom right of your page - shedding in two stages the calyx and corolla!  (I'm a perfect example now of having been given a little information and my conclusions are probably 'a dangerous thing' as the saying goes).  The bark never changes from the smooth grey.imageimageimage

    Many thanks Pat.  I'm going to call it Snow Gum no matter what - as it seems to me it most looks like one.  It's great to give it a name.  (I'd still love to know who sowed it or how it came to be there.  I've been here 30 years and as there are so few gardener neighbours - nobody seemed to notice the tree until it was massive).
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    Last edited: 03 July 2017 15:42:34

  • Pat EPat E Posts: 11,688

    Hi again. At least I can now ascertsain that the leaf veins show that it definitely is NOT a Snow Gum. image . Just call it  Eucalyptus! 

    S. E. NSW
  • Pat EPat E Posts: 11,688

    Yarrow, I walked down to where I planted a Snow Gum which I grew from seed about 20 years ago. I hope you can see the parallel venation. I photograph with an iPad, so not as good as some cameras

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    S. E. NSW
  • yarrow2yarrow2 Posts: 782

    PatE - Thanks again so much.  I can't see your photos just now - on my screen all photos posted since yesterday just come up as small black boxes with an X in the middle.  Will try again later.  Might be my browser - not sure.

  • SpikleSpikle Posts: 6

    Yarrow-no problem at all with you posting-Pat E obviously has a wealth of knowledge on this subject. Sorry for my lack of responses-been working away all week but I haven't been entirely idle and have found another Acacia species which might fit the bill (the absence of any seed pods on my tree was troubling me). So, one of the things which attracted me to my original tiny seedling was the fern-like foliage, quite unlike the leaves on the mature tree. I'be potted up this sucker in case I have to prune or fell the tree and as you can see, the leaves are different.

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    However, the other day I was surprised to discover similar foliage on the parent which I'd never noticed before...

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    So I'm now wondering if it's Acacia Heterophylla or a variation. Can't find much info about the seed pods of this one though...

  • Pat EPat E Posts: 11,688

    Spikle, I'm fairly confident that many Acacia have juvenile leaves like the fern-like ones you found. 

    I was thinking about the identifying problems that you both had originally. One dead give-away is that a crushed leaf will smell of Eucalyptus oil whereas an Acacia won't, so that is worth remembering in the future. The fern like leaf will never be Eucalyptus though, so don't bother crushing that one.image

    Hope you have fun with it.

    S. E. NSW
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