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Japanese anemomes

CopperdogCopperdog Posts: 415

Hello everyone, I have 2 japanese anemones in pots. They've done really well the previous years but this year I'm trying to work out if they've been over watered (common pink one started to go crispy a couple of weeks ago - I had been giving it good watering can full of water everyday) cut some of the dying leaves and stems out thinking it might be a virus? Now white one in another pot is going the same way....or could it be that they hate being in the pots now and are just totally conjested? image

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  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,391

    If they've been in the pots for a few years they will be congested. When a pot gets really full of roots the water isn't retained long enough to be absorbed. 

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,553

    The clumps expand sideways a lot - are you sure it's just not that the pot is now overcrowded?

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • CopperdogCopperdog Posts: 415

    Thanks for your replies, yes I think perhaps they are just exhausted being in there, they looked so promising a couple of weeks ago. My brother in law suggested potting them as he said I might regret letting them loose in the garden! Last year I bought another white one in a 3 litre pot and planted it pot and all in the border. It's looking healthy but I think it's still managing to spread. Perhaps I should just embrace them. I feel they are a little like marmite on this site! Thimk id prefer to try and love them. imageimage

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,553

    :) I like marmite

    They do spread, but quite easy to pull up. I have a patch right in font of a fence and as they progress forward I just pull the leaves out to keep them to about a 3ft semi-circle.
    Good foliage and lovely flowers a bit later in the season - marmite to me :)

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • CopperdogCopperdog Posts: 415

    image think it's time to find a new home for them. Do they generally prefer dry shade or moist shade? 

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 7,736

    Mine do better in part shade they go crispy like yours in full sun, I gather from what I have read they would natural (In Janap) prefer to be on the edge of woodland my garden has a large ammount of clay, it tends to be watered logged in winter, and baked now.I wish they would spread, because they are so expensive to buy, bought a pretty "peach" one last year, where is it!

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,458

    A number of problems with this discussion re Japanese anemones...

    1.- They are certainly not meant to remain constricted to a pot and should be planted out in the ground.

    2.- They hate a full sun aspect, need shade or at least half-shade.

    3.- Talking about "white" or "pink" anemones is really vague. The original poster never mentions the full name of those plants. I planted 2 in my garden 3 years ago, and they are completely different:

    - Japanese anemone 'Whirlwind' grows in excess of 120 cm in diameter and 140 cm high, and keeps expanding;

    - Japanese Anemone 'Fantasy Pocahontas' is much much smaller: about 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm high, and hardly expands at all.

    Copperdog, if you do like Japanese anemones I would advise looking for cultivars of the smaller type, planting them in the ground in half or full shade. And maybe get yourself a new brother-in-law more knowledgeable about plants and gardening.image

    image

    Japanese anemone 'Whirlwind'

    image

    Japanese Anemone 'Fantasy Pocahontas'

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,553

    I've had a clump of Jap Anemones behind my fish pond for over 30yrs. They're in full sun from mid-morning onwards. They continually spread all over the place, but I pull them up where I don't want them, and in a few weeks they'll be masses of blooms. I don't feed them or care for them in any way other than pulling all the dead leaves off in the spring and they're very happy and healthy.

    image

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,925

    I didn't know they liked shade, I've got three different ones, plus the thug type,  and they're all in full sun all day. I haven't got any shade, they'll have to put up with it.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,458

    I'll have to correct my post re sun aspect. When I first wanted Japanese anemones in my garden, the nursery people definitely said "no" to full sun, and that was one reason why I erected a pergola for plants needing protection from the sun, including Japanese anemones.

    I now realise that these plants can accept full sun (as per Lyn and Pete8's posts). Of course "full sun" in the North of Scotland and in the South of France do not mean exactly the same thing.image I expect Pete8's anemones can withstand the sun because they are next to water. I also have a specimen of Hydrangea paniculata 'Sundae Fraise' which is given as being OK in full sun, but these past 2 years it was scorched by the midday sun in the summer.

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
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