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Little blue flower

josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532

When I moved house three years ago I acquired a lovely little blue flower which I think is Triteleia laxa.  I'd love to have more of it, but I can't get the seeds to germinate.  It's only one small clump, so I can't split it.  Has anyone succeeded in growing this from  seed, and if so, how?  May I'll just have to overcome my habitual stinginess and buy some.

Posts

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,376

    I couldn't even get the bulbs to growimage

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,909

    I've never tried but now I've seen them, I want some, just looked at the seeds, cheap and easy so will have a go, come back this time next year, I'll let you know?

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • OnopordumOnopordum Posts: 390

    Try sowing seed in a pot in the autumn and leaving outside over winter.

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,834

    Sorry, but in my garden this is a seed weed of the first order. Comes up in its hundreds and has even changed colour in places. We must have thousands of them and they even survive being turfed out by the moles.

    Seeds, if produced, are best sown fresh when slightly under ripe. Leave therm exposed to the weather and they should them germinate in spring. They take a few years to reach flowering size.

  • jaffacakesjaffacakes IrelandPosts: 424

    I really wanted to try these. Didn't know they can grow from seed but would it not take much longer than from corms?

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532

    Thanks for all the advice.  Seems I've been treating them too well. I'll try exposing them to the elements.

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,909

    I'm not sure if they would take too long to flower from seeds.

    Last year someone on the seed swap sent me some seeds that form bulbs, False Freesia,  they flowered first year, when  I dug them out they were already bulbs.  These look similar.

    They definitely need the cold spell outside through the winter.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,629

    It was me who sent you the False Freesia (Freesia laxa).  It flowers reliably from year one. I also grow a beautiful hybrid, Freesia laxa Joan Evans. I'll have lots of seed by the end of the Summer. 

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,834

    Freesia laxa used to be called Anomatheca laxa and before that Lapeyrousia.They are not related to the Triteleia (used to be Brodiaea) laxa.

    Triteleia laxa does take a while to reach flowering size. I have some clumps which are now in their third year and not ready to flower this season. Possibly grown in pots and heavily fed, they may flower quicker.

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,909
    KeenOnGreen says:

    It was me who sent you the False Freesia (Freesia laxa).  It flowers reliably from year one. I also grow a beautiful hybrid, Freesia laxa Joan Evans. I'll have lots of seed by the end of the Summer. 

    See original post

     Yes! I couldn't remember , I have loads of them now as I collected my own seeds from them as well, very pretty little things, I was amazed how they had made those little corms so quickly, but then a dahlia seed makes a tuber in the first year. All plants are different.

    i would love some seeds later if you have some spare, thank you.

    i know those blue flowers are not related, will have to wait a bit for those.  It took a while for the Monbretia  to flower from seeds.   

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

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