SMALL LEAVES AND DEBRIS ON THE LAWN

An otherwise immaculate lawn is periodically spoilt by small leaves and debris of all kinds,  too small to be picked up by conventional raking tools.  A besom broom seems best,  but up to half a dozen strokes are often required to dislodge the offenders which seem to deride a perverse pleasure in being "embraced" by the lusty grass blades,  and one  -  more often than not  -  still has to bend down to pick them up and THROW them in the bucket!

Surely,  in 2017!,  there exists a tool  (perhaps akin to a gentle scarrifier)  whose rotating brush (?) might propel them into an adequte "debris box" ?

Any suggestions desperately welcome!

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,697

    Don't go for immaculate myself ...... my hairdresser once mentioned that image  ..... and my lawn is of a similar more relaxed style, but if you really can 't bear the more casual look, why not get a Lawn Vac?

    http://www.flymo.com/uk/products/garden-vacuums/ 

    Last edited: 16 June 2017 14:28:22

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,641

    Maybe a large sign "No Small Leaves or Debris Welcome Here"" would do the job.  If I was a small leaf, I'd certainly think twice about landing on such an immaculate swardimage

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,010

    I'd never have to time to go to work or do anything else if I had to pick everything up that landed on my grass!

    Philippe - unfortunately ( or fortunately - depending  on your views)  - gardens aren't like houses, so bits of this and that 'landing' on grass are inevitable. Unless you can control the weather of course......

    Lawn vacs are readily available, as Dove suggests image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Philippe3Philippe3 Posts: 6

    Many thanks.  Lawn vacs are sadly not an option  ;  they are VERY loud  (much louder than a good mower) and not particularly efficient against the little pests described earlier.  Each to their own,  of course,  but we like our lawns to be debris-free,  in the same way that we get more enjoyment out of our borders when they are weed-free.  Perhaps a little too "zen" for some.   Anyway,  as far as chaos is concerned,  we have the house for that,

    Last edited: 16 June 2017 17:05:35

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,697

    Then I see no alternative for you but to ingratiate yourself with the other users of the garden

    image

    perhaps they'll tiptoe around quietly and keep things spick and span  image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,010

    I'm a bit too busy for that Dove - I have a house of my own to look after .....image

    image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,364

    Good grief!

    I wish all I had to worry about in my garden was that patch of green stuff . Its a garden! Petals and leaves will fall on it. Watch the lovely Blackbirds pulling up worms and stuff to feed their chicks. I really enjoy that, if you keep very still the blackbirds  run around you grabbing the worms .

    The alternative is  to take some artificial lawn and plant pots  indoors. You can vacuum the lawn then. .




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

  • Philippe3Philippe3 Posts: 6

    Should it be surprising that those interested enough in participating in a gardening forum should be so uninterested in gardening standards ?  Has excellence sunk so low as to take down with it,  together with all other "dumbing-downs",  the yardsticks suggested,  for instance,  by Dr Essayon ?  There was an author who devoted his entire life in advocating qualities which are,  mostly,  derided in the comments made above.

    As written earlier Each to their own".  But thank you for taking the time  ;  I certainly respect your laisser faire perspective ...  and,  in return,  would hope for the same.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,697

    There are different types of standards in excellence ... among those I strive for in my garden are to be ecologically sound and environmentally friendly ... we don't use insecticides or fungicides - instead we encourage a wide variety of wildlife which keeps pests down to a minimum equable with achieving a sustainable balance.

    As I said, we have not used fungicides or pesticides since we moved here in 2011 and do not have an aphid problem ......... however we do have a large ash tree  full of goldfinches, longtailed tits, bluetits, great tits, robins and other birds ... they eat the aphids.  The ash tree scatters catkins, leaves and twigs on the garden.  I bend down and pick up the large twigs, the rest is gathered by the mower. 

     I get the feeling that my sort of garden is not your sort of garden ... as you say, each to their own.

    However, it is impossible to make an omelette without breaking eggs ... if you want to rid your lawn of all detritus then you need to either make some physical effort or put up with some noise 

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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